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i saw a hair transplant patient and it was horrible


mouse666666
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Today, i was out at KFC eating my lunch and across from me i saw this person he had done a transplant. I could see his liner scar at the back of his head which is horrible. What surprise me the most is that he was still a norwood 6.I think he did his Hair transplant about 10 years ago. I wasnt sure if he had diffuse thin hair, or he had huge amount of shock loss because the permanent zone was very thin, and the graft didnt grow. It really suck that his hair loss had progress over the year leaving him to norwood 6 and the graft at the front didnt grow much.

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i saw a guy today that had an old ugly junk car he

bought ten years ago from a questionable/non-reputable

car lot....plus i doubt he gave his car the "meds" it needed

and he probably only had it worked on once in ten years

it really sucks his old clunker car progressively got worse

Dr. Dow Stough - 1000 Grafts - 1996

Dr. Jerry Wong - 4352 Grafts - August 2012

Dr. Jerry Wong - 2708 Grafts - May 2016

 

Remember a hair transplant turns back the clock,

but it doesn't stop the clock.

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Mouse,

 

Unfortunately, I've seen this in public as well. In this instance, I'm wondering if the patient had surgery recently. This could explain the lack of growth and the potential shock loss appearance in the donor region.

 

However, the reality is that techniques were not always as good as they are today, nor were the results guaranteed. Frankly, I feel like the hair restoration industry has grown by leaps and bounds, and I hope that gentleman knows he does have options for repair today (if that's something he would want).

"Doc" Blake Bloxham - formerly "Future_HT_Doc"

 

Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

 

All opinions are my own and my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

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I wouldn't dismiss the thin donor as shock loss. It can very well be just natural thinning of the donor region which happens much more than guys on the forums, especially reps & docs, would have you believe. The 'permanent zone' is not completely permanent. Another reason to avoid strip. As you age, if your donor thins, the scar could be revealed.

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I wouldn't dismiss the thin donor as shock loss. It can very well be just natural thinning of the donor region which happens much more than guys on the forums, especially reps & docs, would have you believe. The 'permanent zone' is not completely permanent. Another reason to avoid strip. As you age, if your donor thins, the scar could be revealed.

 

If you're making a case for FUE over FUT (and I'm not saying you are), I see a lot of FUE surgeons - some of the best actually - take hair well outside of the very narrowly defined 'safe zone.' As these patients age into their 50s and 60s, I imagine a lot of them will lose a noticeable amount of transplanted hairs. That said, who knows what advancements there will be in the next 20 - 30 years, so it may be a non-issue. This is why I believe it's always best to wait until your MPB is fairly predictable to have any kind of hair restoration work done.

3,425 FUT grafts with Dr Raymond Konior - Nov 2013

1,600 FUE grafts with Dr Raymond Konior - Dec 2018

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If you're making a case for FUE over FUT (and I'm not saying you are), I see a lot of FUE surgeons - some of the best actually - take hair well outside of the very narrowly defined 'safe zone.' As these patients age into their 50s and 60s, I imagine a lot of them will lose a noticeable amount of transplanted hairs. That said, who knows what advancements there will be in the next 20 - 30 years, so it may be a non-issue. This is why I believe it's always best to wait until your MPB is fairly predictable to have any kind of hair restoration work done.

 

Since,

I agree with what you are saying, to a point. How long is long enough to wait though? There is no solid answer. At 35, I may have barely begun to bald from what my final pattern is. Or, I may only slowly thin as the years go by from now on. My father in law is is in his mid 50's and just now starting to show signs of advance loss, but some people show minor loss, like me, for a very long time and then the bottom COULD fall out. My point is, you have to be smart about things, but by no means should everyone wait until they are in their mid-50's to benefit from hair restoration. I was 31 when I started fin and that COULD be masking my final pattern until I'm forty or older. I couldn't wait that long. I hope that there are many advances in the coming years so making the decision on when to take the plunge can be easier. Fortunately, I think that after 30, you are LESS likely to get a major surprise and go from a NW3 to a NW6 overnight, but if we live long enough, most of us will be looking at some kind of advanced stage so if you get one transplant, you should eventually be prepared (no matter what stage you are) to have one or two more over your lifetime.

I am an online representative for Dr. Raymond Konior who is an elite member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

View Dr. Konior's Website

View Spanker's Website

I am not a medical professional and my opinions should not be taken as medical advice.

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How long is long enough to wait though? There is no solid answer.

 

Agreed. I was speaking more in context of FUT vs FUE as we age and what those defined patterns of hair loss might be and how they might affect future results (and donor areas). Although I do believe entering into hair restoration with a more established and predictable pattern of hair loss is beneficial for both patient and doctor.

3,425 FUT grafts with Dr Raymond Konior - Nov 2013

1,600 FUE grafts with Dr Raymond Konior - Dec 2018

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If you're making a case for FUE over FUT (and I'm not saying you are), I see a lot of FUE surgeons - some of the best actually - take hair well outside of the very narrowly defined 'safe zone.' As these patients age into their 50s and 60s, I imagine a lot of them will lose a noticeable amount of transplanted hairs. That said, who knows what advancements there will be in the next 20 - 30 years, so it may be a non-issue. This is why I believe it's always best to wait until your MPB is fairly predictable to have any kind of hair restoration work done.

 

If you have typical mpb there's a good chance as you age every part of the donor will thin, even the 'safe zone.' I'm saying the safe zone is not entirely safe. Luckily for many guys this isn't something that will happen until they are in their 60s.

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Agreed. I was speaking more in context of FUT vs FUE as we age and what those defined patterns of hair loss might be and how they might affect future results (and donor areas). Although I do believe entering into hair restoration with a more established and predictable pattern of hair loss is beneficial for both patient and doctor.

 

Good point. I never developed a noticeable advanced pattern (not yet). It would have been nice to have planted the hairline a little higher but I coudn't if I didn't want to wait. I am a year and a half post op and my native in the hairline hasn't changed, so who knows how many years I would have had to wait to be completely safe. I wasn't ready to wait that long and for the most part, I am happy I didn't.

 

I also agree that years from now, there will likely be some fue patients suddenly thinning from their recipient area from hair being taken out of the safe zone. I too have raised an eyebrow or 2 at some very good surgeons for their extraction zones. Some doctors are very careful with that and not likely to be as affected as others.

 

Hopefully something really awesome comes along and makes it all a moot point.

I am an online representative for Dr. Raymond Konior who is an elite member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

View Dr. Konior's Website

View Spanker's Website

I am not a medical professional and my opinions should not be taken as medical advice.

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I also agree that years from now, there will likely be some fue patients suddenly thinning from their recipient area from hair being taken out of the safe zone. I too have raised an eyebrow or 2 at some very good surgeons for their extraction zones. Some doctors are very careful with that and not likely to be as affected as others.

 

I've been taking Fin since 1997 and in the last several years it has lost some of its effectiveness on me. I realized this while on a job and someone took a picture of me from behind - I couldn't believe how much my crown had thinned out. Not only that, I have quite a wide 'horseshoe' but I noticed a thinning streak from the rear of my crown down into where I see a lot of well-regarded surgeons take grafts with FUE. It doesn't take a genius to guess the outcome of that.

3,425 FUT grafts with Dr Raymond Konior - Nov 2013

1,600 FUE grafts with Dr Raymond Konior - Dec 2018

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