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Does Dr. Erdogan do temple points?


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  • Senior Member

I'd like to see some more of his temporal work with or without a complet frontal hair restoration.

 

It really hasnt been mentioned, but id classify surgical temporal work in three distinct designs that eiher compliment or go against your facial structure depending on how high or low it is:

 

In my analysis and words (the "Sean Formula"), i would define the following temporal shapes as such:

 

1- D or ) shape, this seems to sit well with those with lowered hairlines or lower norwoods to create youthful facial framing based on how far they are brought forward in conjunction to head shape/size. Not really appealing on higher norwoods or mature restorations. Example: Usually guys with these confidently spike their hair up.

 

2- L or \ shape., this also includes those angulated at 45 degrees. This seems to work with both mature and lower norwood levels, DEPENDING on the level of angulation and how far they are brought forward and designed. Example: Usually guys with these can spike up with or without having the need to comb temples forward.

 

3- C or ( shape., this seems to sit alright on those with those higher norwoods and moderately mature hairlines. This also Depends on how far they are brought forward or recessed. The level of angulation of the C shape also matters. Might not be appealing when set on folks with lower norwood levels / dense hairlines. Usually younger guys may comb their temporal areas forward to make things look less conservative or leave them as is if they need to stick their hair up.

 

Another key factor:

The closure of the area where the temples and hairline meet also matter, if it is too sharp it can look off. If it is also properly angulated and blends it can look more natural. The also depends on the surgically placed location/distance from where the twmples and corners meet.

 

Also, another key element with temporal framing and angulations, if the tranplanted areas are too denslu done it can look off and not blend properly with the hair behind it. Either have the same illusion of density or gradually go from thin to thick shades to match the density behind the recipient or transplanted areas.

 

 

Finally, from my research and analysis, not every surgeon has the artistry and aesthetic ability to pull each shape or angulation successfully.surgeons with a very high aesthetic ability to FULLY FRAME the face (frontal area) are probably much better at this versus thos that just work on hairlines and other areas of the scalp.

 

I'd like to see more examples of such varieties of temporal work by capable restoration surgeons.

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  • Senior Member
I posted a lengthy response regarding temple restoration, but it is awaiting moderator approval?

 

Sean,

 

I'm not sure why your post was filtered but I've approved it now.

David - Former Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant

 

I am not a medical professional. All opinions are my own and my advice should not constitute as medical advice.

 

View my Hair Loss Website

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  • Regular Member

Temple points were very important to me. Like you, I have noticed that if this is not done properly on higher norwoods, it tends to look unnatural... or "off" at the very least.

 

Dr. Erdogan did temple points for me at my request. He did not initially think they were necessary, but I insisted. After a few iterations with the blue sharpie, we had temple points that I think work great.

 

His concern was that with my advanced balding he wanted to use the grafts elsewhere. But again, I insisted. I think you are smart to do the same if you think you need them restored.

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  • Senior Member

I think besides the fact many HT surgeons don't offer this is I think many patients don't want or request it And it is why so many HTs look off. The more I look at results the more I aslo don't understand, especially with more advanced hairloss why surgoens dont perform (or patients don't requests) more reasonable hairlines. I know if you are a NW4/5/6 the desire to get a 'full head of hair' is irresistable but it leads ot poor results. IMHO a great HT surgeon would know how to create a great receding hairline. So instead of trying to pull a NW5 hairline to the front and straight, it would make FAR more sense to just rebuild temples and build a nice forelock with some natural recessision. That would frame the face far better and turn somoene from NW5 to NW3 with nice temples to frame from both the front and side, some nice thickness in the forelock and same natural recession (not the razor edged V). I think some smart HT surgeon would learn to specialize in that because some of the results I see that people fawn over here to my eye do NOT look good. Yeah it is a 'head of hair' but not so much better (again IMHO) then the plugs of yore. I have mocked up more than a few results I found here bringing the hairline BACK or receding the sides and then temples in and (again to my eye) looks far far better.

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  • Senior Member

My surgeon wouldn't do it as he said he always has patients coming to him to remove or try to fix the temple points they have had done previously. The reason is that most are left with an island of hair as this region recedes more. Also, he said that despite many of the photos on line looking as though temple points look fine, on closer examination in real life they look strange as the hair is usually too coarse. Still, I would love mine worked on just a tad. Ive always had weak temple points anyway.

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  • Senior Member

I wonder if this surgeon just doesn't have the skill however? I"ve seen some great temple work (Dr. Feriduni comes to mind). I am going to in fact ask if we can use some nape hair. I am 52, my loss is stabilized and that is in fact the lushest part of my hair. So if he can build some very soft temples I will do it. I am very clear on the shape I want too which is based not only on my own older temple points but on the ones that catch my eye; The basically match the curvature of the outside of the eyebrow and maintain the same distance as they do (a fingers width or two) and finally when they are more or less above them then proceed straight up or angle back slightly to the hairline. It is what gives such a great frame both sides and top. It is hard to overstate their importance; from the side they reduce the side of the forehead and draw your eye to the face itself, from the front the reduce the rounded look of the head moving backwards and draw a more rectangular box framing the face and where they meet the reduce the look of this unsupported mop of hair or the strange unnatural looking points. It makes sense the temples would match/indicate the top loss and so it only makes sense they mirror it when it is rebuilt.

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  • Senior Member

My understanding is it takes 400 grafts or so for temple points. I think I have them to spare (he assessed 4700 to get 'perfect results' for hairline, midline,vertex) and that probably means we can get 5,000. Other Drs. said basically 2500 for hairline and 1000-1500 for the crown/vertex so it seems we are already well over budget so to speak (in a good way). So I might also see if he is willing to do nape hair for the temples points. Yeah I know not 'safe zone' but I am 52, stabilized loss and that has always been off the best areas of my hair (just below safe zone); full, soft, plush.

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