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I recently received an email from Dr Bernstein's offce regarding some big steps that have been taking in Cloning Human Hair. Has anyone else heard about this? If so, have you heard of how far we might be to getting there someday?

 

Just curious if others have been hearing about the medical advancements that have been made and if they feel this could be a viable solution in the near future.

 

Thanks,

 

Neal

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From what I understand, there have been some major stalls in the process. I think we are 10 years out at a minimum. Maybe much more.

I am an online representative for Dr. Raymond Konior who is an elite member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

View Dr. Konior's Website

View Spanker's Website

I am not a medical professional and my opinions should not be taken as medical advice.

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Neal,

 

I think Spanker hit the nail on the head. However, I'm curious as to what the email said. Could you share a few more details?

"Doc" Blake Bloxham - formerly "Future_HT_Doc"

 

Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

 

All opinions are my own and my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

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So at 40 years of research, and guessing that we are 80 percent of the way there, we still have 10 years to wait. Which I could deal with, but it will be expensive for the next 10 years that guys like me won't be able to take the opportunity to use it. That is my guess. That is why I think pharm is the best answer so it can really reach the masses.

I am an online representative for Dr. Raymond Konior who is an elite member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

View Dr. Konior's Website

View Spanker's Website

I am not a medical professional and my opinions should not be taken as medical advice.

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Neal,

 

It appears as if this is the news regarding 3D dermal papilla culturing at Columbia University from a few months ago. Definitely important, but - as all respected researchers with the project explain - it's still a ways away.

"Doc" Blake Bloxham - formerly "Future_HT_Doc"

 

Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

 

All opinions are my own and my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

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if Steve jobs was in charge and Apple did hair then this would be out with in 2 years.

 

I'm sure these scientist spend most of their time at work playing Dungeons and Dragons instead of research...they're so slow.

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if Steve jobs was in charge and Apple did hair then this would be out with in 2 years.

 

I'm sure these scientist spend most of their time at work playing Dungeons and Dragons instead of research...they're so slow.

 

 

Yes, I am sure if Steve Jobs was still around, he would have come up with a solution using a new Apple 3-D printer and an iMac!

 

Jeez... what a comment!

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A lot of times, I think hair loss researchers and hair restoration physicians come "under fire" for not doing enough to solve the problem and actually cure alopecia. In many ways, I think this makes sense; compared to some of the other ailments medical science has cured over the years, hair loss seems like an easy one. However, it seems like the closer we get to a permanent solution, and more we appreciate the complexity of alopecia and hair loss pathology.

 

Hair follicles are complicated little organ-oids with multiple regions of stem cell activity/niches, a variety of genetic components, hormonal-driven pathways, etc, etc. Altogether, it will take some time, research, and - in my opinion - some luck to truly "crack the code" and figure out exactly how hair loss occurs and what we can do it prevent it, restore it, or regenerate it.

"Doc" Blake Bloxham - formerly "Future_HT_Doc"

 

Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

 

All opinions are my own and my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

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A lot of times, I think hair loss researchers and hair restoration physicians come "under fire" for not doing enough to solve the problem and actually cure alopecia. In many ways, I think this makes sense; compared to some of the other ailments medical science has cured over the years, hair loss seems like an easy one. However, it seems like the closer we get to a permanent solution, and more we appreciate the complexity of alopecia and hair loss pathology.

 

Hair follicles are complicated little organ-oids with multiple regions of stem cell activity/niches, a variety of genetic components, hormonal-driven pathways, etc, etc. Altogether, it will take some time, research, and - in my opinion - some luck to truly "crack the code" and figure out exactly how hair loss occurs and what we can do it prevent it, restore it, or regenerate it.

 

have scientist really 'cured; lots of ailments though? i can't think of any. But there are treatments for many ailments.

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Dr Bernstein is a well respected doctor in the industry. I am curious as to what the email said and where his thoughts are on the topic. Perhaps you should post or summarize the email.

 

I think it is worthless to guess the timeframe as to when this could be marketable. For all we know there could be something that happens tomorrow that is ground breaking. On the flip side it could never come. Guessing a time frame would just be ignorant in my humble opinion.

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have scientist really 'cured; lots of ailments though? i can't think of any. But there are treatments for many ailments.

 

Measles, polio, small pox, some cancers, penicillin has saved many lives for diseases that would have otherwise killed the pt, and the list could go on.

I am an online representative for Dr. Raymond Konior who is an elite member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

View Dr. Konior's Website

View Spanker's Website

I am not a medical professional and my opinions should not be taken as medical advice.

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Measles, polio, small pox, some cancers, penicillin has saved many lives for diseases that would have otherwise killed the pt, and the list could go on.

 

yeah a few vaccines have been created and saved lots of lives, but there are many other illnesses that don't have vaccines and cancer treatment has hardly changed in 50 years; still too many die from it.

 

If there's no money in it then they won't look for a cure.

 

Have a read of this

'Superbugs could erase a century of medical advances,' experts warn - Health News - Health & Families - The Independent

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Dr Bernstein is a well respected doctor in the industry. I am curious as to what the email said and where his thoughts are on the topic. Perhaps you should post or summarize the email.

 

I think it is worthless to guess the timeframe as to when this could be marketable. For all we know there could be something that happens tomorrow that is ground breaking. On the flip side it could never come. Guessing a time frame would just be ignorant in my humble opinion.

 

He talk about it on his website

 

The researchers have said they may look for drugs rather than cloning hair and reactivate the follicles. They said human trials could start in 3 years, but there's a lot of "ifs". Clinical trials take about 10 years, so this is at least 20 years away from being used.

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