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Marko Ramius

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About Marko Ramius

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  1. I think the issue is less with "strain" to the donor area, or any area, and more with how resistance training can increase your blood pressure. If you're lifting heavy, like doing squats or something, you could valsalva your way to some very high BPs, which could lead to a hematoma.
  2. So I am a first-year medical student, and we just got done with our head/neck section of anatomy (got an A on the lab practical, and one of the highest grades in my class, I'm proud to say). One thing we learned was that, with all the valveless veins, such as emissary veins, etc. in the scalp, draining right into the dural venous sinuses, infections could easily spread, leading to meningitis, etc. How much of an issue is this with this kind of surgery? Obviously, these procedures are done all the time without any kind of complications. Is this even a concern, or is it just theoretical? Or is it more common in pts with a scalp lac who don't clean it or something? Just curious. As a former HT pt myself, it was the first thing that came to mind when we did that lecture. By the way, I'm more than three months post-HT, and everything is progressing nicely. Unfortunately, no pictures, but I'm already seeing a lot of growth from my ~1500-ish grafts, and have been for more than a month now.
  3. So I am a first-year medical student, and we just got done with our head/neck section of anatomy (got an A on the lab practical, and one of the highest grades in my class, I'm proud to say). One thing we learned was that, with all the valveless veins, such as emissary veins, etc. in the scalp, draining right into the dural venous sinuses, infections could easily spread, leading to meningitis, etc. How much of an issue is this with this kind of surgery? Obviously, these procedures are done all the time without any kind of complications. Is this even a concern, or is it just theoretical? Or is it more common in pts with a scalp lac who don't clean it or something? Just curious. As a former HT pt myself, it was the first thing that came to mind when we did that lecture. By the way, I'm more than three months post-HT, and everything is progressing nicely. Unfortunately, no pictures, but I'm already seeing a lot of growth from my ~1500-ish grafts, and have been for more than a month now.
  4. A little less than 11 weeks ago, I had 1500 done in the hairline by Dr. McGrath in Austin. I am pleased to say that things are coming along nicely. Obviously, at this point, I can't really give a comprehensive evaluation of the job, but I can say that I like where things are headed. The peach fuzz started at probably five weeks post-op, and now I'm seeing little black hairs coming up all over the place. I already look a little better, and I think it is going to be a lot better when its all said and done. It is especially coming in nicely up by my genetically-altered hairline, gradually moving things forward. Based on pictures I posted here right after my procedure, most people said that I would probably need another 1000 or so. I talked with Dr. McGrath, and his advice was to wait and see what this looks like, before packing more in there, but that he would be happy to stick more in there if I thought I needed it. Anyway, I'm a first-year medical student now (age 30... career change), and I will likely be going back home this summer. When I do, I'll have him take a look at me and see what he thinks. Until then... so far, so good.
  5. A little less than 11 weeks ago, I had 1500 done in the hairline by Dr. McGrath in Austin. I am pleased to say that things are coming along nicely. Obviously, at this point, I can't really give a comprehensive evaluation of the job, but I can say that I like where things are headed. The peach fuzz started at probably five weeks post-op, and now I'm seeing little black hairs coming up all over the place. I already look a little better, and I think it is going to be a lot better when its all said and done. It is especially coming in nicely up by my genetically-altered hairline, gradually moving things forward. Based on pictures I posted here right after my procedure, most people said that I would probably need another 1000 or so. I talked with Dr. McGrath, and his advice was to wait and see what this looks like, before packing more in there, but that he would be happy to stick more in there if I thought I needed it. Anyway, I'm a first-year medical student now (age 30... career change), and I will likely be going back home this summer. When I do, I'll have him take a look at me and see what he thinks. Until then... so far, so good.
  6. I think that someone who is completely bald should get a 70's-style bush transplanted to the top of their head. Hell, if I ever go completely bald, I'll do it.
  7. Zyprexa can be used to sedate particularly antsy pts. The ativan/haldol combo is also quite the 1-2 punch.
  8. There is more to vitamin Z than just that. Google has failed you.
  9. In four years, you may call me Dr. Marko. Ask your doc for 10 of zyprexa, about 30 minutes before the procedure starts. Or you could just ask to be intubated for the procedure.
  10. Not much you can see, but I can feel it. So at least I know it worked. At least I think it worked. I also have probably 100 or so hairs that have decided to stick around from the transplant. Most of them don't seem to be doing much, and they have broken off, but may be growing out again. A few of them have really started growing, and they look ridiculous. So now I just need to hurry up and wait...
  11. Not much you can see, but I can feel it. So at least I know it worked. At least I think it worked. I also have probably 100 or so hairs that have decided to stick around from the transplant. Most of them don't seem to be doing much, and they have broken off, but may be growing out again. A few of them have really started growing, and they look ridiculous. So now I just need to hurry up and wait...
  12. Next time you feel a little worried about five minutes of pain from a little lido getting injected into your head, and then a few days of soreness, think about this guy, then suck it up...
  13. They didn't mention it as the most prevalent, because this was about "other" causes of hair loss. Right before the list, it says "Androgenetic alopecia is a common cause of hair loss, but there are many others to consider, too." Androgenic alopecia = genetic
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