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Brando

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About Brando

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  1. Bill, Thanks for the input. Dr Cooley emailed me and told me that there's no reason to quit Propecia, just like you said. However...just to be safe.. I believe I'm gonna quit until, if the good Lord blesses us, we're successful. I don't wanna take any chances.
  2. Thanks alot. That's kinda what I had in mind. My doctor told me to take Propecia 3 times a week. He said it would work that way because it stays in your system about 72 hours. Hopefully a month would be long enough to be off it completely.
  3. Hey guys...it's been a while since I've been on this site. My wife and I are wanting to start trying to have a baby very soon. Bill...should I stop Propecia? Any updates?
  4. Here's my story. I had a HT back in 2004 with Dr. Cooley. To this day, the only people that know of my HT are my mother (she drove me back), my father and my sister. I have been married a year now and my wife doesn't even know (I've dated her since 2000). I plan on telling her soon, but I am just so embarassed to talk about it in front of her.
  5. Steve, you can search under Brando and read my experience. However, Dr. Cooley told me that since my procedure in 2004, he's changed the way he "sews" up the donor area. My scar is noticable if I get a haircut with a number 2 guard. You can tell that no hair grows on the scar. Dr. Cooley told me that now he somehow pulls hair over the scar so it's less likely to notice. He told me if I have another procedure, he can actually make the scar look better rather than worse with the 2nd procedure. Dr. Cooley's clinic has a great atmosphere and if you have an experience like mine, you'll be very happy. Good luck and let me know how it goes.
  6. Not a problem, Billo. I'll try to help the best I can!
  7. Thanks, Billo. I'm doing good. How bout you? Darn good lookin' hair man. I seemed to have forgotten what a wonderful hairline you had. I decided to browse the site since I haven't in a good while. I visited with Dr. Cooley a couple weeks ago. He was impressed and told me the latest developments since my procedure in '04. I would really really like a touch up of about 1500 to fill in my hairline a bit more (i'd LOVE to have my hairline look like yours.) Dr. Cooley is indeed the man to do it. I just got married a year ago so money is an issue now.
  8. Just search for me under Brando. Nothing but positive stuff from Dr. Cooley.
  9. LOS ANGELES, California (Reuters) -- Think you've seen it all when it comes to cosmetic surgery? Look more closely. Eyelash transplant surgery wants to become the new must-have procedure for women -- and the occasional man -- convinced that beauty is not so much in the eye of the beholder as in front of the eye itself. Using procedures pioneered by the hair loss industry for balding men, surgeons are using "plug and sew" techniques to give women long, sweeping lashes once achieved only by glued on extensions and thick lashings of mascara. And just like human hair -- for that is the origin -- these lashes just keep on growing. "Longer, thicker lashes are a ubiquitous sign of beauty. Eyelash transplantation does for the eyes what breast augmentation does for the figure," said Dr Alan Bauman, a leading proponent of eyelash transplants. "This is a brand new procedure for the general public (and) it is going to explode," Bauman told Reuters during what was billed as the world's first live eyelash surgery workshop for about 40 surgeons from around the world. Under the procedure, a small incision is made at the back of the scalp to remove 30 or 40 hair follicles which are carefully sewn one by one onto the patient's eyelids. Only light sedation and local anesthetics are used and the cost is around $3,000 an eye. The technique was first confined to patients who had suffered burns or congenital malformations of the eye. But word spread and about 80 percent are now done for cosmetic reasons. For many women, eyelash surgery is simply an extra item on the vast nip-tuck menu that has lost its old taboos. More than 10 million cosmetic procedures -- from tummy tucks to botox -- were performed in the United States in 2005, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. The figure represents a 38 percent increase over the year 2000. Erica Lynn, 27, a Florida model with long auburn hair, breast implants and a nose job, had eyelash transplants three years ago because she was fed up with wearing extensions on her sandy-colored lashes. "When I found out about it, I just had to have it done. Everyone I mention it to wants it. I think eyelashes are awesome. You can never have enough of them," Lynn said. Bauman, who practices in Florida, does about three or four a month. Dr. Sara Wasserbauer, a Northern California hair restoration surgeon, says she has been inundated by requests. "I have been getting a ton of eyelash inquiries ... If I had $10 for every consultation, I'd be a rich woman." The surgery is not for everyone. The transplanted eyelashes grow just like head hair and need to be trimmed regularly and sometimes curled. Very curly head hair makes for eyelashes with too much kink.
  10. LOS ANGELES, California (Reuters) -- Think you've seen it all when it comes to cosmetic surgery? Look more closely. Eyelash transplant surgery wants to become the new must-have procedure for women -- and the occasional man -- convinced that beauty is not so much in the eye of the beholder as in front of the eye itself. Using procedures pioneered by the hair loss industry for balding men, surgeons are using "plug and sew" techniques to give women long, sweeping lashes once achieved only by glued on extensions and thick lashings of mascara. And just like human hair -- for that is the origin -- these lashes just keep on growing. "Longer, thicker lashes are a ubiquitous sign of beauty. Eyelash transplantation does for the eyes what breast augmentation does for the figure," said Dr Alan Bauman, a leading proponent of eyelash transplants. "This is a brand new procedure for the general public (and) it is going to explode," Bauman told Reuters during what was billed as the world's first live eyelash surgery workshop for about 40 surgeons from around the world. Under the procedure, a small incision is made at the back of the scalp to remove 30 or 40 hair follicles which are carefully sewn one by one onto the patient's eyelids. Only light sedation and local anesthetics are used and the cost is around $3,000 an eye. The technique was first confined to patients who had suffered burns or congenital malformations of the eye. But word spread and about 80 percent are now done for cosmetic reasons. For many women, eyelash surgery is simply an extra item on the vast nip-tuck menu that has lost its old taboos. More than 10 million cosmetic procedures -- from tummy tucks to botox -- were performed in the United States in 2005, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. The figure represents a 38 percent increase over the year 2000. Erica Lynn, 27, a Florida model with long auburn hair, breast implants and a nose job, had eyelash transplants three years ago because she was fed up with wearing extensions on her sandy-colored lashes. "When I found out about it, I just had to have it done. Everyone I mention it to wants it. I think eyelashes are awesome. You can never have enough of them," Lynn said. Bauman, who practices in Florida, does about three or four a month. Dr. Sara Wasserbauer, a Northern California hair restoration surgeon, says she has been inundated by requests. "I have been getting a ton of eyelash inquiries ... If I had $10 for every consultation, I'd be a rich woman." The surgery is not for everyone. The transplanted eyelashes grow just like head hair and need to be trimmed regularly and sometimes curled. Very curly head hair makes for eyelashes with too much kink.
  11. My doctor told me to take it every other day. It stays in your system long enough to work as effective as if you'd take it every day. Plus, it saves you money.
  12. kg007 is right, my hairloss was limited to the temple/hairline region. If you're balding all over, you may want to rethink a HT right now.
  13. RoboNick, search this site for my pics. I posted some from right after the procedure all the way up to a year update. I haven't noticed any more hairloss. I'm on Propecia every other day (as prescribed by Dr Cooley). It's been 2 years, but if you look at my 1 year update pics, I look the same today. Good luck.
  14. I am 22 years old. I was 20 when I had 1250 grafts on the hairline transplanted. You can search for my pics and experience on this site. I do not regret my decision. I am willing to do another session if I need to in the future. My doctor was one of the best, Dr. Cooley. I ruled out shaving my head b/c I doubt I would've looked good with a shaved head anyway.
  15. Yeah I've seen the show. I don't think it looks like he's had any work done. He does have a pretty high hairline though, and he stays pretty tan so that helps.
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