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While shopping for follicular unit extraction (FUE)...


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  • Senior Member

The aspects of FUE that patients should be mindful of is cost, transection rate of the surgeon, and experience of the surgeon's medical assistants. Surgical hair restoration is an investment for the patients that can be for better or worse. A patient shouldn’t pay too much and shouldn’t pay too little for an FUE session. FUE is more labor intensive than FUT, and hence there is difference in cost of the procedures.

 

Transection is the terminal damage of a patient’s precious donor resources. Since donor resources are certainly finite, patients should want to ensure that their surgeon is producing minimal trauma in their donor area. A good FUE surgeon can provide its patient with a relatively low rate of transection. Damaging a significant amount of hair will usually provide poor aesthetic results and insurmountable loss to restore future hair loss. There is no better way of describing this atrocity than considering a patient to be a donor of their hair follicles to medical science. Wasting hair to inefficient harvesting methods essentially realizes a patient to be an unsuspecting victim and statistic.

 

Knowing just a few small details can help a patient explore the many options available by follicular unit extraction. Any surgery will produce scarring. Similar to FUT, FUE can also cause noticeable scarring when performed by untrained hands. Oftentimes, physical scarring will also cause emotional scarring that can have permanent effects. Taking the advantage of available knowledge is the best way to identify a bad FUE surgeon. Ironically, the lack of knowledge can produce a bad FUE surgeon. FUE surgeons will be better than others regardless of their experience so proper training is key.

My opinions are based on my beliefs and are simply my own. I am one representative of the WHTC clinic.

Free Consultation Dates & Cities for Dr. Patrick Mwamba

 

Brussels, Belgium - Available

London, United Kingdom - Available

Zurich, Switzerland - Available

Bologna, Italy - Available

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Dr. Patrick Mwamba is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians

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  • Regular Member

 

Transection is the terminal damage of a patient’s precious donor resources. Since donor resources are certainly finite, patients should want to ensure that their surgeon is producing minimal trauma in their donor area. A good FUE surgeon can provide its patient with a relatively low rate of transection. .

 

HI WHTC, i thought that transected grafts fully regrew. Isnt there some stemcell regeneration going?

 

also on an unrelated note, how many days before a transplant should a patient stop using minoxidil if any at all.

 

Thanks

 

Zagh

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • Senior Member

@Zagh

 

Hello there. You definitely don't want hair transection during any conventional surgical hair restoration procedure. A conventional session of FUE should never encompass the intentional transection of any hair follicle. The process that you are referring to is a simple technique of stem cell regeneration where the surgeon intentionally bisects the graft at a certain location after it has been successfully removed from the donor area. When the graft has been bisected at the appropriate area, there are two parts that remain for implantation. The idea is that each part will produce a complete hair, thus providing two hairs that can possibly be used more than once.

 

 

Transection is cutting a graft at any particular location in a straight fashion. Transection is unintentional terminal damage to the follicle in the conventional FUE hair transplant session. Typically the FUE transection of the grafts will occur during the extraction process while the graft remains in the patient’s donor area. In a conventional FUE and FUT session, each transection is essentially sufficient to prevent the hair from any further growth. The term bisect is more commonly associated with the unconventional FUE procedure involving bisecting a graft into two portions. With certain stem cell regeneration methods the bisection of the graft occurs above the dermal papilla. The idea is to implant these two portions of the graft along with growth factors to allow for stem cell production to produce two hairs.

 

 

The discontinuation of minoxidil is requested by many clinics at about five days prior to surgery. Minoxidil can accelerate blood flow, and for this reason a particular clinic may request that patients discontinue its use, however, quite often, Dr. Patrick Mwamba, MD, allows our patients to remain on the product prior to their surgical procedure without any complication at all. Obviously, each patient is different and should be treated as such.

 

 

I hope that the language that was used in this response is helpful to explain the answers your questions. Please don’t hesitate to ask anything else of me that could be of any help to you. You can also find a rather lengthy one-on-one interview of Dr. Patrick Mwamba by Spencer Kobren where they discuss the subject of donor hair regeneration. Spencer Kobren, who is founder of The International Alliance of Hair Restoration Surgeons and president of 'The Bald Truth' hosts the live interview where in-depth questions regarding hair regeneration are directly answered by Dr. Patrick Mwamba, MD, the founder of World Hair Transplant Center. The interview was added on WHTC's youtube about three weeks ago.

My opinions are based on my beliefs and are simply my own. I am one representative of the WHTC clinic.

Free Consultation Dates & Cities for Dr. Patrick Mwamba

 

Brussels, Belgium - Available

London, United Kingdom - Available

Zurich, Switzerland - Available

Bologna, Italy - Available

Follow us: Facebook - Youtube - Pinterest

 

Dr. Patrick Mwamba is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians

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