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Hi Everyone,

Just wanted everone to know, I just had my third procedure done by Dr.True in New york, and again, I think they are the best.This was basically a touch up procedure.Everytime I go there I have a wonderful experience with Dr. True, and his entire staff.I cannot speak highly enough about them.

As far as the result goes, I could not have been more pleased.Anyone considering a HT, definately should check them out.

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Hi Everyone,

Just wanted everone to know, I just had my third procedure done by Dr.True in New york, and again, I think they are the best.This was basically a touch up procedure.Everytime I go there I have a wonderful experience with Dr. True, and his entire staff.I cannot speak highly enough about them.

As far as the result goes, I could not have been more pleased.Anyone considering a HT, definately should check them out.

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They were actually on top of my list, before I hit the internet. I saw their infomercial on TV, only to learn later on that this may be one of the red flags to look for. Anyways - good luck.

 

"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic''. Arthur C. Clarke

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I have seen infomercials for Bosley, MHR and Nuhart. But not Elliot-True. Maybe they don't advertise in my area?

 

I did get some of their sales literature, way back when. I know they use dialators. What red flags are you talking about?

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doesn't need to use infomercials in order to get customers. The best docs are booked months in advance, based on satisfied customer references only.

 

"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic''. Arthur C. Clarke

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Microprose,

 

Sorry, I guess I didn't read your post closely enough. You're saying an informercial is a red flag. Fair enough. Still, I didn't know Elliot and True had an informercial.

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Dilators were developed by Dr Marritt as a technique to minimize graft manipulation and potential trauma when placing grafts in very small receptor sites. I used them in my practice as did many others during the early ninties when large session mini and micro grafts were first used. As techniques evolved toward follicular unit grafts the dilators became unnecessary. I last used dilators about five years ago. When some people used dilators thay had problems with skin damage. I never saw that. I think this was because we always used very small dilators. At any rate this discussion is of histortical note only. Comments implying I am still using dilators and "outofdate" are ill informed and inappropriate.

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Yes we do use an infomercial. If you have ever seen it, you know that it is very informative and clinical. Thus, it is different than most infomercials which rely on traditional sales techniques.

 

The majority of my patients come from referrals from previous and current patients. I supplement this with advertising as do the majority of hair transplant specialists - whether that be print, television or internet. To me the key in any advertising is that it ascribe to the highest ethical standards and be clinical and informative in nature. I routinely hear during consultations that people find our ads and materials to be among the most honest and infrmative they have encountered.

 

You may not be aware that Pat Hennessey is planning television advertising as an adjunct to his web services. If you take a simplistic and dogmatic stance, you will need to reject this entire site because it associated with "infomercials."

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The warning about avoiding clinics who use infomercials is a little vague I suppose.

 

One problem with commercials is that they cast too wide of a net for potential patients, which combined with some of the deceptive sales tactics that are used, can mislead the wrong type of patient into a hair transplant clinic. Most of the infomercials I've seen make it look like a hair transplant is the "solution to hair loss", featuring testimonials from patients who had trivial amounts of hair loss, showing off what appears to be full heads of hair. It misleads people about what hair transplants are, and what they are used for.

 

One of the things I see repeatedly on the internet is people who need to have myths and misconceptions cleared up; and they are getting these misconceptions from TV commercials. These commercials are actually misleading people about what a hair transplant is, and what a hair transplant can and cannot do. For example the Bosley commercial shows a 3D animation of individual hairs "magically" flying from the donor area to the front, where it creates a dense, full head of hair. That is false advertising. Instead of using that air time to say something truthful, Bosley chooses to deliberately mislead people, instead.

 

Typically, only large franchise clinics have advertised with commercials. There is nothing inherently wrong with large clinics, except that they have earned themselves a solid reputation as hair mills: clinics where the emphasis is on high volume and patient turnover, and not on individual attention, honesty, or quality care.

 

I get the impression that some good HT doctors think the issue of hair mills is not "their" problem to deal with, or does not affect them. Maybe this infomercial question is one area that will prove those doctors wrong, as hair mills have helped earn the entire field a bad reputation in the view of the general public. The infomercial has traditionally been the domain of the hair mill. It may take some time and effort to undo that notion. Like it or not, the Elliot & True infomercial shares the stage with the Bosleys, NuHarts and MHRs of the world. So there is nothing wrong with infomercials, but the vast majority of clinics that advertise this way are not reputable, in my opinion.

 

I have seen the Elliot & True commercial, many months ago. From what I recall, there was nothing out of line or misleading there.

 

Maybe the assumption that infomercials should always trigger caution is outdated (or will become outdated). However, there is quite a bit of damage and mistrust that hair mills have created, that still needs to be undone.

 

[This message was edited by arfy on July 08, 2003 at 11:16 AM.]

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Arfy

 

I thoroughly agree that any kind of advertising in any medium that is deceptive or gives false promise is contemptible and to be avoided. Many infomercials do, as you say, present patients with minimal hair loss who now have completely full heads of hair, falsely implying that this is what everyone should expect from a transplant even when they have extensive hair loss.

 

I also take issue with those who show Class 5A/6 patients with an aerial top view showing full head baldness, but in the after they show the frontal view only. The implication is that the fullness produced in the front is present throughout the balding pattern when in fact the person is still completely bald in the rear half of their pattern. I have seen this on television, newspaper ads, and on most internet sites, including this one.

 

No matter what medium, the rule should be to "tell it like it is" - to show the full story. Show the same before and after views with the same camera, lighting etc. If you have looked at our web pages you see we always show all views. We also show full views and close-up comb throughs on television. The judgement should be made according to honesty and thoroughness of the advertising not the medium used.

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I also take issue with those who show Class 5A/6 patients with an aerial top view showing full head baldness, but in the after they show the frontal view only. The implication is that the fullness produced in the front is present throughout the balding pattern when in fact the person is still completely bald in the rear half of their pattern. I have seen this on television, newspaper ads, and on most internet sites, including this one.

 

 

 

Amen to that!

 

For the record, I brought up dialators only because someone mentioned red flags. I sensed he was referring to dialators (he was in fact, referring to infomercials). A disclaimer, of sorts, on Elliot'True's use of dialators accompanied one of their videos I got a few years back.

 

As for advertising, almost every company does it to one degree or another. It is up to the consumer to decide where he draws the line.

 

Anyway, if any comments in my first post were interpreted as offensive to Dr True, I apologize. That wasn't my intent.

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