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Question on hair characteristics


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  • Senior Member

Ok, my hair has always been very straight and fine. When I was younger and a stoner in high school (1980's), I wore it very long past my shoulders and at least down to my chin in front. It will start to curl around a bit once its about 6 to 8 inches long but that it. Then for 20 yrs I shaved it in the military down to a 1/2 clip. That basically leaves just a stubble of covering on the scalp; very short.

 

When I retired last year and let it grow for 6 or 7 months, I think it didn't know what to do with its self. It stuck out ridiculously until it was long enough for its own weight to pull it down. That is when I SADLY discovered there wasn't enough left in the front temple/sides areas to be able to have it longer without it looking stupid. Had that persistant forelock becoming diconnected from the mid-scalp area and smooth BALD skin on the HUGE temple areas. Looking silly, I still left it like that for a few more months just because, after 20 yrs of shaving it once a week, it felt great to feel hair blowing around my head and my ears covered.

 

Anyway, once I did finally shave it down again, when it started growing back, it layed nice and flat and smooth I assume from those months of being trained to lay down under its own weight. It looked better that it had in years at that length.

 

To get to the point: many people mention their growing transplanted hair as wirery, curly, or stiff. Do i have this too look forward to? That is going to be kind of funny looking if so. Will it "eventually" go back to normal? It was very straight hair that was transplant from the back. The hairs themselves also seemed thicker than hairs on the top and sides of my head. I do plan to grow it out longer once I have it so this might help disguise any texture difference but I was just curious. And by longer I only mean down around my eyebrows kind of long; not my old shoulder length bong hit hair.

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  • Senior Member

Ok, my hair has always been very straight and fine. When I was younger and a stoner in high school (1980's), I wore it very long past my shoulders and at least down to my chin in front. It will start to curl around a bit once its about 6 to 8 inches long but that it. Then for 20 yrs I shaved it in the military down to a 1/2 clip. That basically leaves just a stubble of covering on the scalp; very short.

 

When I retired last year and let it grow for 6 or 7 months, I think it didn't know what to do with its self. It stuck out ridiculously until it was long enough for its own weight to pull it down. That is when I SADLY discovered there wasn't enough left in the front temple/sides areas to be able to have it longer without it looking stupid. Had that persistant forelock becoming diconnected from the mid-scalp area and smooth BALD skin on the HUGE temple areas. Looking silly, I still left it like that for a few more months just because, after 20 yrs of shaving it once a week, it felt great to feel hair blowing around my head and my ears covered.

 

Anyway, once I did finally shave it down again, when it started growing back, it layed nice and flat and smooth I assume from those months of being trained to lay down under its own weight. It looked better that it had in years at that length.

 

To get to the point: many people mention their growing transplanted hair as wirery, curly, or stiff. Do i have this too look forward to? That is going to be kind of funny looking if so. Will it "eventually" go back to normal? It was very straight hair that was transplant from the back. The hairs themselves also seemed thicker than hairs on the top and sides of my head. I do plan to grow it out longer once I have it so this might help disguise any texture difference but I was just curious. And by longer I only mean down around my eyebrows kind of long; not my old shoulder length bong hit hair.

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  • Senior Member

Hi

 

Transplanted hair goes through an initial phase where it is a bit coarse in texture but this will smooth out within a couple months .. Eventually, the hair will take on the same characteristics as the others.. The only difference may be if your hair is thinning the new hair will be fuller as it is DHT resistant

JOBI

 

1417 FUT - Dr. True

1476 FUT - Dr. True

2124 FUT - Dr. True

604 FUE - Dr. True

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My views are based on my personal experiences, research and objective observations. I am not a doctor.

 

Total - 5621 FU's uncut!

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  • Senior Member

I wonder if the lack of density of the HT areas affects things. (Not in the way the individual hairs form & grow, but rather in the way that they lay & clump together in groups.)

 

I know that in my thinner areas, the hairs probably seem more curly just because each individual hair is more "freed up" than the thinner areas. The thicker areas have more "weight" to the hair mass and every hair has more hairs close around it which helps hold it in line. Areas with more thickness/density seem to hold everything a little bit straighter that way.

 

 

--------------------------------------------------

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  • Senior Member

Pushing,

 

These guys are pretty accurate as to what to expect. It will take probably up to 18 months or so before the hair starts to cooperate and take on characteristics of the surrounding hair and blend better to be similar to the previous native hair.

 

This is not exactly the same topic, but I have a patient that had a HT and I would categorize it as an excellent result however all the new frontal hair is much more grey. You can clearly see where the new hair is placed. I would think that he might have to dye hair if he wants it all to blend. It is kind of too bad because otherwise his results are perfect.

 

NN

NN

 

Dr.Cole,1989. ??graftcount

Dr. Ron Shapiro. Aug., 2007

Total graft count 2862

Total hairs 5495

1hairs--916

2hairs--1349

3hairs--507

4hairs--90

 

 

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