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FUE into Trico scar


Guest youngguy24
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Guest youngguy24

If someone was to have a strip surgery with a 30cm trico scar. Could a doctor pack a lot of FUE into the scar allowing the patient to shave down to a #1 without the acar being extremly noticable? I lknow this depends on the person but a guess would be appreciated.

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Guest youngguy24

If someone was to have a strip surgery with a 30cm trico scar. Could a doctor pack a lot of FUE into the scar allowing the patient to shave down to a #1 without the acar being extremly noticable? I lknow this depends on the person but a guess would be appreciated.

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  • Senior Member

No-- the scar tissue will still be present, regardless of the amount of FUE grafts that are inserted.

 

To this date, I have yet to see a patient shave down to a #1 who had a Trico closure and the be unoticeable.

 

The whole theory behind the Trico is not to necessarily make the incision "scarless" but rather, to help disguise the resulting scar tissue.

 

In addition, the prepped or "trimmed" hairs (upper or lower lip of the incision) that grow through the scar are believed to act like a bonding agent and provide further stability to the scar tissue.

 

I am not a very big fan of FUE into scar tissue. The growth is unpredictable, and does little to actually hide very large scars.

 

I am of the opinion that scar revision should be tried first, and that FUE from the scalp, and then FUE from the body should be used in that order to mask the scar tissue.

 

I tell every potential patient that you have to be prepared to wear your hair at least at a #3-4 guard or a HT is not right for you. The chance exists that your scar will be undetectable at a #2 guard, but there is no guarantee.

 

Please view this thread on the Trico closure in order to research exactly what is being done.

 

http://www.hairrestorationnetwork.com/eve/showthread.php?t=151774

 

Take Care,

J

Go Cubs!

 

6721 transplanted grafts

13,906 hairs

Performed by Dr. Ron Shapiro

 

Dr. Ron Shapiro and Dr. Paul Shapiro are members of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

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  • Senior Member

Hi

 

Guard 2 is acceptable goal as mentioned

 

1 is pushing it

JOBI

 

1417 FUT - Dr. True

1476 FUT - Dr. True

2124 FUT - Dr. True

604 FUE - Dr. True

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My views are based on my personal experiences, research and objective observations. I am not a doctor.

 

Total - 5621 FU's uncut!

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  • Senior Member

Good advice, B.

 

This is something that seldom seems to be mentioned. Even if you have FUE into a scar, the scar is still there. It's akin to tricho closure where the hair is already growing through. I also would recommend scar revision first using tricho for the hair to grow through naturally rather than risk FUE with possibility of no growth.

Hairbank

 

1st HT 1-18-05 - 1200 FUT's

2nd HT 2-15-06 - 3886 FUT's Dr. Wong

3rd HT 4-24-08 - 2415 FUT's Dr. Wong

 

GRAND TOTAL: 7501 GRAFTS

 

current regimen: 1.25mg finasteride every other day

 

My Hair Loss Weblog

 

Disclaimer: I'm not a Doctor (and have never played one on TV ;) ) and have no medical training. Any information I share here is in an effort to help those who don't like hair loss.

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Dear Youngguy24

The B spot is right in regard to the fact that the scar tissue would still be present but it can be camouflaged to a high degree. There is variability in the survival of grafts placed into scar tissue but if there is a good blood supply and the scar is not atrophic (thinned out) the grafts can do well. Ron Shapiro and I wrote a section on this in the Hair Transplantation textbook.

I think that using FIT in this instance is particularly reasonable. It might however be best to consider a scar revision with a ledge closure initially.The surgery should be performed with someone well experienced in the closure. Once that has healed FIT could be used id necessary.

As B spot points out I don't think anyone could guarantee that you could use a #1 blade after the procedures but there are patients in whom the scar is so well hidden that use of a number one blade may be possible.

Paul T. Rose, MD, JD

President ISHRS

Board of Trustees ISCLS

 

Dr. Paul Rose is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians

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  • Senior Member

Dr. Rose--- you have a JD?

 

When did you find the time to pursue a law degree!!!!!!

 

After I earn mine, we can discuss the legality of some of these issues as well icon_smile.gif

 

Take Care,

J

Go Cubs!

 

6721 transplanted grafts

13,906 hairs

Performed by Dr. Ron Shapiro

 

Dr. Ron Shapiro and Dr. Paul Shapiro are members of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I think that the use of FIT into scars is reasonable. The growth of grafts in scars is variable. In scars where there is an apparently good blood supply one can usually get excellent growth. In scars that are very thin in thickness, what would be termed atrophic, the growth is often diminished. In fact Dr Ron Shapiro and I wrote a section about this in the Hair Transplant textbook.

I generally advise patients to have a scar revision and then consider following this with FIT if necessary. I also try to incorporate a "ledge" tricophytic closure if possible.

My technique for tricophytic closure not only camoulflages the scar but produces a beter finer scar. I have found that various surgeons who have tried to copy my technique do not copy it accurately. The depth of the tissue they take is often too deep and the the tissue is taken with a scissor instead of a scalpel.The use of the scalpel allows for a true ledge rather than a slope that is simply brought together.

Paul T. Rose, MD, JD

President ISHRS

Board of Trustees ISCLS

 

Dr. Paul Rose is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians

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Dear J

Sorry for the repetition I didn't see my previous posting.

As for the law degree I would be happy to discuss the legal issues. There are certainly many issue that come to mind in this industry.Feel free to write or call me

Regards

Dr Rose

Paul T. Rose, MD, JD

President ISHRS

Board of Trustees ISCLS

 

Dr. Paul Rose is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians

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