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Hi Bill, i know you have told me fake hair is illegal in the states and is generally shit.

 

I respect your opinions.

 

In australia however, (where i live)i am pretty sure fake hair transplants are allowed, according to my research.

 

Since it is an option for me. I was wondering if anyone has done any research on this or has actually undergone a fake hair transplant?

 

Does anyone at all, think its a good idea ?

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No, not a good idea. Implanting the fake hair can result in micro-scarring and seriously reduce your candidacy for a hair transplant.

 

Not to mention the potential infectious issues that can result.

 

A human hair weave or a toupee (Hair Club for men) is your best non-surgical option at this time. Don't be fooled be commercials until you have seen several people up close and personal, it is very different in person.

 

Take Care,

Jason


Go Cubs!

 

6721 transplanted grafts

13,906 hairs

Performed by Dr. Ron Shapiro

 

Dr. Ron Shapiro and Dr. Paul Shapiro are members of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

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Guest wanthairs

higher than average chance your body has awfull reactions to it and they fall out very soon and need constant replacement

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B Spot is correct, I have a friend who got one of those glued on hair pieces at Hair Club, you could spot it with no problem, it would lift up slightly, could see the threads where it was sewn together. After a couple of months, he got rid of it and looks better bald. He spent 3k for nothing. Slowly

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synthetic hair transplants are illegal in the USA because of the problems and complaints that were happening as a result of having it done. I looked into doing this as one of my options because it was still being done then. It was banned right after that. They attach hair (could be real or fake) to tiny aluminum (or similar. Maybe plastic) tips. Sort of like putting a small piece of metal around the end of the hair and crimping the metal so the hair stays on it. Then they make the slits in the donor area and put the hair "grafts" in so the metal ends are in your scalp. After a few days the healing of the holes they made will grow around and over the metal tips, so they can't come out.

 

You end up with several thousand little pieces of metal/plastic/whatever they use in your head. The hair doesn't grow because it's fake, so it's always the same length. Over time natural occurrences such as combing your hair, strong winds if your hair is being blown around, shampooing your hair, etc slowly makes the implanted hairs come out, many times leaving the tips lodged in your head. After maybe 2 years you need to go back to do an overall fill in to replace all of those that fell out. This includes surgically removing any of the pieces that remain lodged into your scalp. After you do that a few times your head will be so scarred... and you have to continue going back for a refill every few years forever. You'll also have to deal with small infections on an ongoing basis because of having 4000 little pins in your head constantly. Your body doesn't like that and will keep trying to reject them. That leads to pain and stinging when you try to comb your hair or when someone puts their hands through your hair.

 

Nearly everyone who was going through this process eventually had them all removed for one reason or another (money, infections, pain, etc). Then you are left with a bald head full of scars which makes it harder to have a real hair transplant which you should have done in the first place.

 

Did I convince you not to go this route yet?

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Originally posted by BeHappy:

synthetic hair transplants are illegal in the USA because of the problems and complaints that were happening as a result of having it done. I looked into doing this as one of my options because it was still being done then. It was banned right after that. They attach hair (could be real or fake) to tiny aluminum (or similar. Maybe plastic) tips. Sort of like putting a small piece of metal around the end of the hair and crimping the metal so the hair stays on it. Then they make the slits in the donor area and put the hair "grafts" in so the metal ends are in your scalp. After a few days the healing of the holes they made will grow around and over the metal tips, so they can't come out.

 

You end up with several thousand little pieces of metal/plastic/whatever they use in your head. The hair doesn't grow because it's fake, so it's always the same length. Over time natural occurrences such as combing your hair, strong winds if your hair is being blown around, shampooing your hair, etc slowly makes the implanted hairs come out, many times leaving the tips lodged in your head. After maybe 2 years you need to go back to do an overall fill in to replace all of those that fell out. This includes surgically removing any of the pieces that remain lodged into your scalp. After you do that a few times your head will be so scarred... and you have to continue going back for a refill every few years forever. You'll also have to deal with small infections on an ongoing basis because of having 4000 little pins in your head constantly. Your body doesn't like that and will keep trying to reject them. That leads to pain and stinging when you try to comb your hair or when someone puts their hands through your hair.

 

Nearly everyone who was going through this process eventually had them all removed for one reason or another (money, infections, pain, etc). Then you are left with a bald head full of scars which makes it harder to have a real hair transplant which you should have done in the first place.

 

Did I convince you not to go this route yet?

 

Fascinating, thanks for sharing that info.

 

Hard to believe that this type of surgery is allowed anywhere, even harder to believe that someone would go thru with such a thing.

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BeHappy,

 

Thank you for the detailed account of what synthetic hair transplantation would be like. Clearly this would create more problems than benefit.

 

With your permission, I would like to use your response to this question on our hair loss Q&A blog to educate those who are considering this as a hair loss treatment.

 

You will of course, receive the credit for this article.

 

Bill

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With your permission, I would like to use your response to this question on our hair loss Q&A blog to educate those who are considering this as a hair loss treatment.

 

Sure. Of course!

Thank you.

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