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Is there any difference between the top 10% of hair transplant surgeons?

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Hey guys

I'm in the process of selecting a hair transplant surgeon and have been obsessing over "researching" doctors. But I stopped to wonder, is there really much difference between the top, let's say, 10% of hair transplant surgeons? At what point does it make a difference? The top 1%? And if so, what are those differences? Thoughts?

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7 hours ago, gemini said:

Hey guys

I'm in the process of selecting a hair transplant surgeon and have been obsessing over "researching" doctors. But I stopped to wonder, is there really much difference between the top, let's say, 10% of hair transplant surgeons? At what point does it make a difference? The top 1%? And if so, what are those differences? Thoughts?

Just like in any other trade they are different people.  I would certainly promote meeting in person a few doctors rather than just booking blindly.  It's a question of trust.

Sure, it is an expense but if you can afford $10,000+ then surely a few months extra wait and $1000 spent on visits is worthwhile for peace of mind.  I remember some guy on here did a tour of Belgium and met 3/4 doctors over a couple of days.

 


4,312 FUT grafts (7,676 hairs) with Ray Konior, MD - August 2013

1,145 FUE grafts (3,152 hairs) with Ray Konior, MD - August 2018

763 FUE grafts (2,094 hairs) with Ray Konior, MD - January 2020

My results thread from 1st procedure.

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The difference in terms of skill is probably negligible, the difference is in the philosophy and ethics. Some surgeons are pro FUE and others are pro FUT, find a surgeon who isn't biased and performs both procedures on a regular basis. Moreover, find out how the physician treats unhappy patients. 

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I do not provide medical advice, recommendations, all responses are my opinion.

My Hair Transplant Journey

Melvin- Associate Publisher and Forum Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q&A Blog.

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16 hours ago, gemini said:

Hey guys

I'm in the process of selecting a hair transplant surgeon and have been obsessing over "researching" doctors. But I stopped to wonder, is there really much difference between the top, let's say, 10% of hair transplant surgeons? At what point does it make a difference? The top 1%? And if so, what are those differences? Thoughts?

I've been pondering how to answer this.  Not easy when you consider the industry.  Yes, they're call doctors.  Oh wait....What type?  Would you say in layman terms that a surgeon is more "apt" than an anesthesiologist? I am honestly not trying to put anyone down.  I realize how difficult that career is, (my son is just finishing his third year).  

The second thing to consider is the fact there is no school for this.  If a doctor decides to get into it it's perhaps because he is tired of being on call all the time and would rather have a 9:00 to 5:00 job.  You are still a doctor but now have a life.  But going back to the school issue.....The first question is....where did they learn to do this?  Do they have a fellowship of any kind? Did they just read a book?

Taking into consideration full results of a procedure can typically take a year, imagine a novice.  Does his first transplant procedure and waits a year.  Sees the results and makes adjustments.  He now has to wait another year to see those results.  If you follow this train of thought, in my view, it would take a good 7 years for a doctor to have the "experience" required to do the job properly.  And this is considering the fact that the doctor training him was good at this.

I honestly don't care of the doctor is a pioneer.  If he's been doing bad work from day one, he will continue the same trend.

So, if I was a doctor getting into the arena, I would find the best and pay my dues.  Get a fellowship.  LEARN, get experience under the umbrella of someone successful. The sad thing is, there is no regulation of any type despite these guys working on the common folk. This is the reason why this site is important and why I donate my time.  

So, how do you choose? Results.  It is all about results after all.  View "thousands" of photos.  Ask the doctor about his training.  If he's good, he'll be thrilled to tell you.

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Good question...I think there is a difference w/in the top 10%. I would pay particular attention to consistency, ethics, patient rapport, and how comfortable you are at that level. 

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The difference between the top surgeons is usually their artistry and philosophy of hair transplants and hairline design. One may like to do more aggressive, low hairlines and another may usually do higher hairlines. One may like to create new temple points and another may prefer to leave the temple points alone unless they are very receded. One may prefer to go for more density and another may prefer to give you a bit lower density in order to conserve more for the future, etc, etc.

 

Let's assume you have done a lot of research and picked out 3 to 5 top surgeons who all have great reviews and lots of good before and after photos and video, but you can't pin it down to the one you should go with. What I will tell you is to get an idea of what type of hairline you want and try to pick the one who usually performs transplants to the closest that you are thinking you want for yourself. Be honest with yourself. It's great to look at Brad Pitt and say "I want that type of hair", but after many years of seeing guys go through hair transplants I think most men are really looking to get back to what they once had (or at least somewhat close to it) even if they think some other guys hair looks awesome, they won't necessarily like it on themselves if they get their hair transplant that way because when they look in the mirror they don't look like the younger version of themselves that they remember. This is not always the case, but I believe it usually is.

 

So, if you had a straight hairline when you were younger (or even still have, but higher and thinner), you will probably want to consider a Dr who does straighter hairlines. If you always had a widows peak then you will probably not be so happy with that straight hairline and perhaps you should go with a Dr who does a more M shaped hairline. If you never had thick, forward protruding temple points then you should probably not get that done. I think you get the idea.

 

I've seen enough guys who had a hair transplant which looks good to most observers, but the patient is very unhappy with it and this is usually the reason. Sure it looks great, but they don't recognize themselves anymore and that can be a real issue even if the hair transplant was successful in all other ways.

 

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