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I'm having trouble committing to a transplant, and can't pull the trigger.

I'm a NW 3, 28 years old, and it's really affecting my life, but I'm so concerned with the "what if's".

What if the transplant fails, what if my recession progresses to the point that getting more transplants isn't an option, and so on. Every surgeon I've spoken to says I'm a candidate, but this is simply from a few photographs, with no way of knowing what the future holds.

How did everyone get over the hump, and overall, are you happy that you had the procedure?

It's such a weird place, to be so desperate to fix your hair, but still so cautious about the future.

Thanks all.

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It is completely normal to feel in such a way. The main thing is to feel ready, be a suitable candidate and to do your research as to who should be doing your procedure. It is also important in your case to commit to maintenance therapy to avoid a great deal of progression. Once you're happy with that, there is no reason to be worried or concerned. If getting bald bothers you, then fixing it right is one of the most rewarding/satisfying things ever. 

Best of luck to you!

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Hi man,

Been in the same situation as I’m sure many here have been too.

I decided to go for it after a couple years of doing more detailed research on doctors, results and just how exactly the procedure is done from fue surgery YouTube videos to acclimate me to all the bloody gore and needles during the surgery, it helped ease my worry. Fear of the unknown is the worst so just jump into all the details so as not to be surprised and afraid.

I also followed many ht journeys on here as well as YouTube (thanks to Matt Dominance and his daily progress videos, they were so valuable, his honesty of his progress and experience I don’t think anyone else did as many daily progress videos as he)

Also, I’m a bit older than you and had already lost a fair amount and said to myself enough is enough of the procrastinating and started contacting clinics to get the ball rolling. You don’t have to rush it, as long as you initiate things and follow through you will get to the point of the day of your procedure and you will be very nervous but also very excited that the day is here finally.

Good Luck and hope you post about your procedure and progress when you are ready.

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28 minutes ago, Greg_Swanson said:

I'm having trouble committing to a transplant, and can't pull the trigger.

I'm a NW 3, 28 years old, and it's really affecting my life, but I'm so concerned with the "what if's".

What if the transplant fails, what if my recession progresses to the point that getting more transplants isn't an option, and so on. Every surgeon I've spoken to says I'm a candidate, but this is simply from a few photographs, with no way of knowing what the future holds.

How did everyone get over the hump, and overall, are you happy that you had the procedure?

It's such a weird place, to be so desperate to fix your hair, but still so cautious about the future.

Thanks all.

You are not ready for the procedure. You have not researched enough and do not have adequate information to go ahead. 

I think you should have more research for now. You are only ready when you know exactly what you want and how you want it.

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Counsellor at Eugenix Hair Sciences

Dr. Arika Bansal & Dr. Pradeep Sethi

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5crlGyTac2hlU1gHneADzQ

 

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42 minutes ago, Greg_Swanson said:

I'm having trouble committing to a transplant, and can't pull the trigger.

I'm a NW 3, 28 years old, and it's really affecting my life, but I'm so concerned with the "what if's".

What if the transplant fails, what if my recession progresses to the point that getting more transplants isn't an option, and so on. Every surgeon I've spoken to says I'm a candidate, but this is simply from a few photographs, with no way of knowing what the future holds.

How did everyone get over the hump, and overall, are you happy that you had the procedure?

It's such a weird place, to be so desperate to fix your hair, but still so cautious about the future.

Thanks all.

An ethical surgeon will look at your current situation and plan for the long term. At 28, I would personally say you have at least 2 surgeries in you if you intend to keep your hair well into your latter years.

There is always a small chance the transplant will fail, but you reduce that risks by going to a doctor and a team that is tried and trusted.

Myself and thousands of other patients have been advised of surgery through sharing photos, again it is a proven method that works. 

Not everyone gets over the "hump", some will ponder for years, whereas some will take that leap, get their hair fixed and move on. 

Like most things in life, eventually a decision has to be made..............

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Kindest Regards

Shera   -   UK Representative and Patient Adviser for Dr. Tejinder Bhatti     View My FUE HT Story

UK Email : darlingbudsUK@gmail.com    UK Freephone : 0800 634 8588   WhatsApp Call/Message: +44 7708 018667

I am not a medical professional. All opinions are my own and my advice should not constitute as medical advice.

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On 5/15/2019 at 9:18 PM, DrTBarghouthi said:

It is completely normal to feel in such a way. The main thing is to feel ready, be a suitable candidate and to do your research as to who should be doing your procedure. It is also important in your case to commit to maintenance therapy to avoid a great deal of progression. Once you're happy with that, there is no reason to be worried or concerned. If getting bald bothers you, then fixing it right is one of the most rewarding/satisfying things ever. 

Best of luck to you!

Thanks, Doctor, that's good advice. I am very conscious of taking a conservative, and long-term approach, I'm just not too sure what my hair will end up like. 

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On 5/15/2019 at 9:28 PM, CosmoKramer said:

Hi man,

Been in the same situation as I’m sure many here have been too.

I decided to go for it after a couple years of doing more detailed research on doctors, results and just how exactly the procedure is done from fue surgery YouTube videos to acclimate me to all the bloody gore and needles during the surgery, it helped ease my worry. Fear of the unknown is the worst so just jump into all the details so as not to be surprised and afraid.

I also followed many ht journeys on here as well as YouTube (thanks to Matt Dominance and his daily progress videos, they were so valuable, his honesty of his progress and experience I don’t think anyone else did as many daily progress videos as he)

Also, I’m a bit older than you and had already lost a fair amount and said to myself enough is enough of the procrastinating and started contacting clinics to get the ball rolling. You don’t have to rush it, as long as you initiate things and follow through you will get to the point of the day of your procedure and you will be very nervous but also very excited that the day is here finally.

Good Luck and hope you post about your procedure and progress when you are ready.

Hey Cosmo,

Thanks a lot, I appreciate the thoughts.

I've seen your results, and they honestly look great! Very happy for you : )

If/when I do, I will definitely keep everyone updated.

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23 hours ago, Shera said:

An ethical surgeon will look at your current situation and plan for the long term. At 28, I would personally say you have at least 2 surgeries in you if you intend to keep your hair well into your latter years.

There is always a small chance the transplant will fail, but you reduce that risks by going to a doctor and a team that is tried and trusted.

Myself and thousands of other patients have been advised of surgery through sharing photos, again it is a proven method that works. 

Not everyone gets over the "hump", some will ponder for years, whereas some will take that leap, get their hair fixed and move on. 

Like most things in life, eventually a decision has to be made..............

Hey Shera,

I believe you are correct, and I always thought I'd need 2, maybe 3, or ever more surgeries given my history. 

That is also true, I guess I was just worried about my donor being subject to miniturisation at some stage, due to my history.

Thanks for your advice.

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Posted (edited)

 

If nothing else, I could not have worded @Gabreille Nelson Mukhia  's answer better myself. 

At this point, you're not ready for a HT. It's fine, it just means you need more research. I'm your age, by the way, so it's not a knock on your maturity.

I've posted comments elsewhere, but I'm going to copy them here if it helps you. The first is the "why" and the second is the "how". They are in order! 

 

My advice for you

1. Try the finasteride. I didn't and wish I would have known about it in my early 20s. Maybe I could have delayed a HT.

2. It is important to put a value on a HT. What is it worth to you? Financial cost of procedure, time cost of awkward recovery period, emotional cost of missing events/ fielding awkward questions.

3. What do you stand to gain? Self confidence that will manifest in all social interactions. Removal of the anxiety/emotional burden of balding. If you're single, it'll open up more dating opportunities for you. (In my case) Not being age discriminated for entry level jobs post college. Whatever else applies to your case. It could well be that you have little benefit from a HT. It also could remove any self-imposed hair-loss barriers that open you up to the world. Weigh 2 vs 3.

4. Choose with conviction. Either way, own your decision and know it's best for you. If you get a HT, don't feel ashamed or embarrassed. It is the best choice for you. When people ask "why" I tell them, "I considered it for a long time, and I felt it was the right time for me. I've always been concerned about my hair loss. I am fortunate to be alive at a time when baldness is treatable with a permanent and "natural" (my own hair!) solution. I am happy to answer any questions you have." - The questions then don't focus on my choices (since I addressed them from the start) but focus on "does/did it hurt, How long is it good for, How long does it take to see results, How much?" By taking control of your situation, you take the power out of the tough questions. Your friends and family will support your decision if you present it as a decision that was best for you!

 

 

I have a strength in personal finance and budgeting

Before you jump in: Timing could cost you $X,xxx more or less depending on when you travel. Also know the travel costs involved. You have time when it sounds like $ is more of an issue. So be smart with your time to get the most value for your $:

1. Create a list of doctors. (You should) Prioritize the doctors who you see yourself using, and then add them to the list. Usually their websites will list a range. I don't recommend "shopping" docs at this point - asking what they will charge. Build your list first, I'll come back to this point.

2. If you're looking for value, look up the Countriesyou find the surgeons you wish to hire. Use google flights to explore destinations from your Country's airports (plural) to those country airports. Find the cheapest airport for that country, then find the cheapest time to fly - the month or time of year. You're not booking yet, you're only assembling a cost database for the 2-5 countries abroad you've found reputable doctors for. I can help if you don't understand this.

3. Now that you know what you should pay for the travel, find out what lodging and transport looks like in that country. How long do you plan on staying there? Estimate a per-day rate for each country.

*Personally, I am passionate about this, but I recommend traveling while you're there. Feel free to ignore this, because it is purely an opinion.

4. Now that you know when the best rates for travel are, plan to book a procedure during that time Next year. It will do four things: A. Allow you to save and ensure you can get that travel rate in the future (I can explain on the booking a travel plan theory later). B. Allow you to establish dialog and communication with a clinic where you feel confident in your doc, and set expectations on the procedure, talk about hairlines etc. C. It will Ensure that your doc is available when you want your procedure done and D. Allow you to save up some money/clear off some credit card balance etc. to afford the procedure/ pay off the airfare after you book it.

5. Now that you have the costs for travel, the narrowed list of surgeons, the open communication with those surgeons, ask the price. Build it into your budget. Travel + expenses while there + HT + Qualitatives (things to do if you travel, idk, but these are "what it's worth to you if all else is equal" among surgeons/total price). Then do your own cost analysis and get the best value. Value = benefits/costs.

Now: I mentioned FUT is cheaper than FUE. Just know that there are benefits to both, but know that there exist good surgeons who perform FUE at a cost which is less than other surgeon's FUT. Geography changes costs.

I can answer any questions you have. 

I do think it will be in your best interest to create a list of say, 20 docs you're at least interested in (who fall somewhat in your budget), then ask for opinions. If you don't do 80%+ of the doc research yourself, I think that you won't really have the confidence in the result, and may experience buyer's remorse. I hesitate to tell you with confidence what may be best for your cosmetic future.

 

 
Edited by Lennney
's didn't credit Nelson, fixed it
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Posted (edited)
On 5/15/2019 at 7:01 PM, Greg_Swanson said:

I'm having trouble committing to a transplant, and can't pull the trigger.

I'm a NW 3, 28 years old, and it's really affecting my life, but I'm so concerned with the "what if's".

What if the transplant fails, what if my recession progresses to the point that getting more transplants isn't an option, and so on. Every surgeon I've spoken to says I'm a candidate, but this is simply from a few photographs, with no way of knowing what the future holds.

How did everyone get over the hump, and overall, are you happy that you had the procedure?

It's such a weird place, to be so desperate to fix your hair, but still so cautious about the future.

Thanks all.

 

Take it from a 24 year old who's just gone from a Norwood 2A to a Norwood 1 from a single hair transplant. I'll tell you about the things I've overlooked in my quest to restore my hairline:

1. I probably could have avoided getting the HT if I had got on finasteride and minoxidil. As mentioned, I was a norwood 2A then, which means I had a wispy forelock and very receded temples. I was so afraid of the shedding phase and having to remain on drugs for the rest of my life that I did not consider how effective they could have been for me. I probably would have completely regrown my forelock and a small part of my temples, making me a norwood 1.8 or 2. 

7 months after my HT, I had results that I was happy with, but realised that there was a straight line of about an inch running across my head behind the transplanted area which contained mostly short and miniaturized hairs. Imagine my horror when I now had a full head of hair but was still receding from behind the transplants. Looking at pre-op photos, the hairs that got miniaturized mostly provided cosmetic coverage, but a more informed person would have been able to tell that they were not perfectly healthy terminal hairs, and so would be prone to shock loss. Shock loss I did get, and they came back thinner and weaker than before when they finally regrew. I am now on finasteride and soon, Minoxidil, in hopes of saving these miniaturized follicles. If I could restore them to terminal hairs, my transplant would then be considered an astounding success.

Shock loss WILL happen to weak hairs around the recipient sites (even if these hairs still provide cosmetic coverage), and a good surgeon will make sure you are aware of this risk and plan your transplant accordingly. If I had gotten on fin and minox before the surgery, the hairs around my transplant would probably have been strong enough to resist the trauma of the surgery.

2. Waiting for the transplants to grow out was hellish for me. I am by nature a neurotic person, so the anxieties of waiting for my transplant to grow out, coupled with the fear of having people find out really did a number on my mental health. I had extremely bad depressive phases and anxiety attacks because I actually looked worse off than before the transplant due to shock loss.

Consider how mentally resilient you are and make plans about how you are going to deal with others and yourself while waiting for the transplants to grow out. It is only around the 6th and 7th month when you will receive significant cosmetic coverage from your transplants. Having used to be a model, actor and college heartthrob was what made this journey so painful for me. Some people on this forum get by with honesty and vulnerability. It's up to how mentally resilient you think you are.

3. Hair transplant results will never look as good as when you still had hair. This is especially true for the hairline, which is immediately visible to everyone. Hair transplants are meant to give you a dense look, not actual density, so while it may look good in almost all social situations, it will actually feel different and less dense to the touch for you.

Frontal hair loss is usually treated by dense packing at the hairline and then reducing density as the surgeon moves back to conserve your donor. This means that preservation of the hair behind the transplanted area is extremely critical to an aesthetically pleasing result. You do not want a wall of hair at the front with weak hair behind it (try and imagine looking at a skateboard ramp from the side. Flat and weak hair that gradually gives rise to a wall of hair). 

4. Manage your expectations. I cannot emphasize the importance of this. I went into  my HT believing that my results are going to be like Armani patients (the original Armani lol) and that I'll regain a semblance of my former glory. Thinking back, this was probably just wishful thinking on my part because I was still in shock over my hair loss, and I wanted to convince myself that this would be the easiest path to getting my hair (and all the things associated with my handsome looks) back.

What I actually got was a result that nobody could tell was from a hair transplant, and which other surgeons whom I've met locally, call 'good work'. When I look in the mirror, I notice all the imperfections (differences in density between a natural hairline and a transplanted one, patches of lower density behind or around the hairline, how different lighting can affect the perception of density) but it seems like noone but me is bothered by this. 

Would I have gone ahead with my HT were I to have known all of these? Probably, but only because the area requiring transplantation would be a lot smaller and also because I could have stood a chance against shock loss.

In other words, Greg, only consider a HT when you have exhausted all your options of medical treatment, and when you are aware of what a hair transplant will do, can do, and cannot do for you.

All the best mate.

Edited by Leftwithrope
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14 hours ago, Lennney said:

 

If nothing else, I could not have worded @Gabreille Nelson Mukhia  's answer better myself. 

At this point, you're not ready for a HT. It's fine, it just means you need more research. I'm your age, by the way, so it's not a knock on your maturity.

I've posted comments elsewhere, but I'm going to copy them here if it helps you. The first is the "why" and the second is the "how". They are in order! 

 

My advice for you

1. Try the finasteride. I didn't and wish I would have known about it in my early 20s. Maybe I could have delayed a HT.

2. It is important to put a value on a HT. What is it worth to you? Financial cost of procedure, time cost of awkward recovery period, emotional cost of missing events/ fielding awkward questions.

3. What do you stand to gain? Self confidence that will manifest in all social interactions. Removal of the anxiety/emotional burden of balding. If you're single, it'll open up more dating opportunities for you. (In my case) Not being age discriminated for entry level jobs post college. Whatever else applies to your case. It could well be that you have little benefit from a HT. It also could remove any self-imposed hair-loss barriers that open you up to the world. Weigh 2 vs 3.

4. Choose with conviction. Either way, own your decision and know it's best for you. If you get a HT, don't feel ashamed or embarrassed. It is the best choice for you. When people ask "why" I tell them, "I considered it for a long time, and I felt it was the right time for me. I've always been concerned about my hair loss. I am fortunate to be alive at a time when baldness is treatable with a permanent and "natural" (my own hair!) solution. I am happy to answer any questions you have." - The questions then don't focus on my choices (since I addressed them from the start) but focus on "does/did it hurt, How long is it good for, How long does it take to see results, How much?" By taking control of your situation, you take the power out of the tough questions. Your friends and family will support your decision if you present it as a decision that was best for you!

 

 

I have a strength in personal finance and budgeting

Before you jump in: Timing could cost you $X,xxx more or less depending on when you travel. Also know the travel costs involved. You have time when it sounds like $ is more of an issue. So be smart with your time to get the most value for your $:

1. Create a list of doctors. (You should) Prioritize the doctors who you see yourself using, and then add them to the list. Usually their websites will list a range. I don't recommend "shopping" docs at this point - asking what they will charge. Build your list first, I'll come back to this point.

2. If you're looking for value, look up the Countriesyou find the surgeons you wish to hire. Use google flights to explore destinations from your Country's airports (plural) to those country airports. Find the cheapest airport for that country, then find the cheapest time to fly - the month or time of year. You're not booking yet, you're only assembling a cost database for the 2-5 countries abroad you've found reputable doctors for. I can help if you don't understand this.

3. Now that you know what you should pay for the travel, find out what lodging and transport looks like in that country. How long do you plan on staying there? Estimate a per-day rate for each country.

*Personally, I am passionate about this, but I recommend traveling while you're there. Feel free to ignore this, because it is purely an opinion.

4. Now that you know when the best rates for travel are, plan to book a procedure during that time Next year. It will do four things: A. Allow you to save and ensure you can get that travel rate in the future (I can explain on the booking a travel plan theory later). B. Allow you to establish dialog and communication with a clinic where you feel confident in your doc, and set expectations on the procedure, talk about hairlines etc. C. It will Ensure that your doc is available when you want your procedure done and D. Allow you to save up some money/clear off some credit card balance etc. to afford the procedure/ pay off the airfare after you book it.

5. Now that you have the costs for travel, the narrowed list of surgeons, the open communication with those surgeons, ask the price. Build it into your budget. Travel + expenses while there + HT + Qualitatives (things to do if you travel, idk, but these are "what it's worth to you if all else is equal" among surgeons/total price). Then do your own cost analysis and get the best value. Value = benefits/costs.

Now: I mentioned FUT is cheaper than FUE. Just know that there are benefits to both, but know that there exist good surgeons who perform FUE at a cost which is less than other surgeon's FUT. Geography changes costs.

I can answer any questions you have. 

I do think it will be in your best interest to create a list of say, 20 docs you're at least interested in (who fall somewhat in your budget), then ask for opinions. If you don't do 80%+ of the doc research yourself, I think that you won't really have the confidence in the result, and may experience buyer's remorse. I hesitate to tell you with confidence what may be best for your cosmetic future.

 

 

Hey mate,

Firstly, thanks so much for such a comprehensive reply, it means a lot!!

I'm currently on Fin, and have been for a couple of years, seemed to slow the recession, but it's still occurring in the hairline. 

The biggest thing that you mentioned, is the value. 

As of now, it's really, really effecting so many aspects of my life. The things I'm avoiding are increasing, and it's hindering my decision making - as silly as that may sound. I'm about to graduate from a post-grad degree, in which I'm always in a lab, and can wear beanies, hats, and so on. This will be changing once I move into the industry, and I won't be able to hide my hair. 

Money is honestly not an issue. Like yourself, I have a pretty solid financial foundation and employment, so I have ample funds for anywhere as of this stage. Mind you, I wouldn't wager I'd need a huge op, so, even an expensive doc won't be doing a megasession. 

The thing that spooks me the most, is my family history. Hairloss is very, very extensive, and I guess I'm just concerned at how vulnerable even my donor may be to DHT. 

I've also got a list of docs, and have narrowed it down to a couple. At this stage, I'm trying to zero in on a doc who is really ethical, and will help me plan a conservative, and long-term approach. 

Everything you said makes perfect sense, so thanks heaps for that mate - I appreciate it. 

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2 hours ago, Leftwithrope said:

 

Take it from a 24 year old who's just gone from a Norwood 2A to a Norwood 1 from a single hair transplant. I'll tell you about the things I've overlooked in my quest to restore my hairline:

1. I probably could have avoided getting the HT if I had got on finasteride and minoxidil. As mentioned, I was a norwood 2A then, which means I had a wispy forelock and very receded temples. I was so afraid of the shedding phase and having to remain on drugs for the rest of my life that I did not consider how effective they could have been for me. I probably would have completely regrown my forelock and a small part of my temples, making me a norwood 1.8 or 2. 

7 months after my HT, I had results that I was happy with, but realised that there was a straight line of about an inch running across my head behind the transplanted area which contained mostly short and miniaturized hairs. Imagine my horror when I now had a full head of hair but was still receding from behind the transplants. Looking at pre-op photos, the hairs that got miniaturized mostly provided cosmetic coverage, but a more informed person would have been able to tell that they were not perfectly healthy terminal hairs, and so would be prone to shock loss. Shock loss I did get, and they came back thinner and weaker than before when they finally regrew. I am now on finasteride and soon, Minoxidil, in hopes of saving these miniaturized follicles. If I could restore them to terminal hairs, my transplant would then be considered an astounding success.

Shock loss WILL happen to weak hairs around the recipient sites (even if these hairs still provide cosmetic coverage), and a good surgeon will make sure you are aware of this risk and plan your transplant accordingly. If I had gotten on fin and minox before the surgery, the hairs around my transplant would probably have been strong enough to resist the trauma of the surgery.

2. Waiting for the transplants to grow out was hellish for me. I am by nature a neurotic person, so the anxieties of waiting for my transplant to grow out, coupled with the fear of having people find out really did a number on my mental health. I had extremely bad depressive phases and anxiety attacks because I actually looked worse off than before the transplant due to shock loss.

Consider how mentally resilient you are and make plans about how you are going to deal with others and yourself while waiting for the transplants to grow out. It is only around the 6th and 7th month when you will receive significant cosmetic coverage from your transplants. Having used to be a model, actor and college heartthrob was what made this journey so painful for me. Some people on this forum get by with honesty and vulnerability. It's up to how mentally resilient you think you are.

3. Hair transplant results will never look as good as when you still had hair. This is especially true for the hairline, which is immediately visible to everyone. Hair transplants are meant to give you a dense look, not actual density, so while it may look good in almost all social situations, it will actually feel different and less dense to the touch for you.

Frontal hair loss is usually treated by dense packing at the hairline and then reducing density as the surgeon moves back to conserve your donor. This means that preservation of the hair behind the transplanted area is extremely critical to an aesthetically pleasing result. You do not want a wall of hair at the front with weak hair behind it (try and imagine looking at a skateboard ramp from the side. Flat and weak hair that gradually gives rise to a wall of hair). 

4. Manage your expectations. I cannot emphasize the importance of this. I went into  my HT believing that my results are going to be like Armani patients (the original Armani lol) and that I'll regain a semblance of my former glory. Thinking back, this was probably just wishful thinking on my part because I was still in shock over my hair loss, and I wanted to convince myself that this would be the easiest path to getting my hair (and all the things associated with my handsome looks) back.

What I actually got was a result that nobody could tell was from a hair transplant, and which other surgeons whom I've met locally, call 'good work'. When I look in the mirror, I notice all the imperfections (differences in density between a natural hairline and a transplanted one, patches of lower density behind or around the hairline, how different lighting can affect the perception of density) but it seems like noone but me is bothered by this. 

Would I have gone ahead with my HT were I to have known all of these? Probably, but only because the area requiring transplantation would be a lot smaller and also because I could have stood a chance against shock loss.

In other words, Greg, only consider a HT when you have exhausted all your options of medical treatment, and when you are aware of what a hair transplant will do, can do, and cannot do for you.

All the best mate.

Hey man,

Thanks for the detailed response, and congrats on your op.

I've seen pics, and I honestly think your hair looks great. 

The shock-loss and the growing out phase sounds torturous. Like you, I too am pretty neurotic, and am prone to worrying about everything lol. I can only imagine how rough the first half a year is.

I'm currently on Fin, but am experiencing a dense shed, and have been for a couple of months. So, safe to say, there is probably a lot more miniturisation that I can see with the naked eye. 

It's something I feel like I need to do, or at least attempt, if nothing else but due to how much it already is impacting my day-to-day life.

Thanks heaps for the advice, mate - really appreciate it!
 

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Posted (edited)

At first I wasn't going to reply to this thread since we have a big age difference.  I had my first transplant at age 64.  I would probably guess that I was a Norwood 4 or 5.  6 Months after my first transplant I was amazed at the results.  My second transplant at age 71 was just as amazing as the first.  I will have no more procedures even though I could use some in the crown area.  I believe my hair loss has stopped.  If you are considering Medical Travel I would suggest you research that completely because if you think you have apprehension now you can double or triple that with Medical Travel.  I have researched this for years, and concluded that I would be totally out of my element.  First thing I would suggest that you are able to pay cash for your treatment.  I know that is a hefty chunk of change, but debt will just add to your apprehension.  Research the doctor very well concentrating on black marks on his record such as malpractice.  My transplants were done by FUT and then by FUE using different doctors.  In both cases the doctors only did the medical part and the grunt work was done by technicians, and I am totally satisfied.  You must decide if you are OK with this. 

The actual procedure was no big deal for me except laying on a table for so long.  The only pain I felt was the injections for the FUE.  My biggest concerns at first was that I looked ridiculous for at least 2 weeks and in the case of FUE it was 3 months because of them shaving the donor area.  You next thing will be worrying that it didn't work, but try not to really think about that for 6 months.  Some guys obsess about this checking the mirror all the time - that will drive you crazy.  HANG LOOSE - GET YOUR FINANCES IN ORDER, AND THEN IT IS JUST NOT THAT BIG OF A DEAL.

P.S. Read my signature line.  Your mind can imagine horrible outcomes that will never come to pass.

Edited by Dazed

"Imagination frames events unknown in wild fantastic shapes of hideous ruin, and what it fears, creates." Hannah More

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Good topic. 

I often have patients ask me during consultations if it is "worth it" or if they "should do it." I tell them that I never tell a patient they should do surgery; that is always a decision that must be made by the patient. I often tell people they should not do surgery, but never that it will be "so worth it" for them or that they "should do it." As I said before, this is a personal decision and one that, in the end, you have to make for yourself. You are doing the right thing; have doctors evaluate to determine whether or not you are a good candidate for surgery, and then ask patients about their experience and how they dealt with the decision to "take the plunge." 

What I will say is that at the end of the surgical day, most of these patients who had doubts like this are typically very happy and feel relieved. It feels good to make a proactive decision and do something to better yourself or address something bothering you. And thankfully, modern hair transplant work pretty darn well! 

Best of luck with your decision. Looks like you are getting some great feedback from members here. 


Dr. Blake Bloxham is recommended by the Hair Transplant Network.

 

 

Hair restoration physician - Feller and Bloxham Hair Transplantation

 

Previously "Future_HT_Doc" or "Blake_Bloxham" - forum co-moderator and editorial assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, Hair Restoration Network, Hair Loss Q&A blog, and Hair Loss Learning Center.

 

Click here to read my previous answers to hair loss and hair restoration questions, editorials, commentaries, and educational articles.

 

Now practicing hair transplant surgery with Coalition hair restoration physician Dr Alan Feller at our New York practice: Feller and Bloxham Hair Transplantation.

 

Please note: my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

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