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Finasteride might just be the most misunderstood drug or the most manipulative seducer. 

Especially when it comes to the part of a physician prescribing it to the patients or not prescribing it, it becomes almost impossible to come out unscathed. One most definitely does not want to be blamed for being the cause of anybody's sexual disintegration. 

If the physician prescribes it, the patients are really not sure if they are walking down the right path. Especially when it comes to the sexual side effects, most patients are super sensitive about it. "Thou shalt not mess with my libido!!!" But then again they want to lose no more hair. Sometimes the effects are Psychogenic. However, that's the worst. Real side effects stop after withdrawing from the medications. People who "think" that they have side effects with the medication "feel" that the negative effects have been sustained in their bodies. Now how can one ever cure a feeling!!! The devotion  towards "Lord libido" can cause irrational and biased fears.

If the physician does not prescribe the medication, then the patients feel violated at worst. They feel misinformed, underinformed or downright cheated. If you discourage then from taking it then they will feel that "nothing is impossible" and taking useless treatments (I shall not name them for my own safety 😉😉😉), would do the trick. However, Mr. Dihydrotestosterone is least bothered and the other treatments can "talk to the hand!".

If the physician gives the patients a choice... Lord almighty, all hell breaks loose!!! Nothing in the world can compare to the mayhem then! 

The level of indecisiveness exhibited with taking Finasteride is overwhelming when you see the poor individuals battle it out within themselves. Sometimes no amount of reassurance can be of help.

But facts and figures apart, is it ethical for the doctors to prescribe this medication - Finasteride to the patients? It is FDA approved but definitely not "Lord libido" approved. And "Mr. Dihydrotestosterone" does not have very nice things to say about it.

Sometimes "Lord libido" must be revered. But what if the fear of this "Lord libido" demands for the sacrifice of the virgins called "hair"?

But most times it's "All hail Lord Libido"... 


Counsellor at Eugenix Hair Sciences

Dr. Arika Bansal & Dr. Pradeep Sethi

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5crlGyTac2hlU1gHneADzQ

 

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Gabreille, let's take your "report" one step at a time....

Finasteride might just be the most misunderstood drug or the most manipulative seducer.   (What are you talking about)?  Proscar, the parent medication, is used to treat prostate issues.  Patients were coming back to their doctor with more hair and this was the beginning of it all.  

Especially when it comes to the part of a physician prescribing it to the patients or not prescribing it, it becomes almost impossible to come out unscathed. One most definitely does not want to be blamed for being the cause of anybody's sexual disintegration

Perhaps it is the specialty of the doctor that dictates their level of knowledge.  I think it is fair to say that a PCP in a family practice would probably know a lot less about hair loss than a hair transplant surgeon that has been dealing with the subject for years.  Perhaps this is the misunderstanding you are referring to?    If you don't know something, ask or refer the patient to someone that does know the answer.  The worse thing that can happen is for a patient to remain uneducated and do nothing.  How many times have we heard "I wish someone would have explained all of this when I still had my hair."

You mention "sexual side effects" throughout your script.  There are other side effects associated with the medication and there always seems to be more come out that had not been discussed previously.  And there have been benefits discussed as well.  The latest I heard, from a doctor that did his thesis on the subject, dealt with possible dementia after years of use.  We'll have to wait and see what comes of this.  For me, I plan to take the medication for the next 200 years.  (Let's bring back the parent medication, Proscar, for a second.  How many millions of patients take this medication, successfully to address prostate issues?  Do you hear of all the side effects they are experiencing?  Consider that this is a 5mg pill, which is 5 times Propecia/Finasteride dose).

The power of the mind is incredible. If I was to give a patient an M&M and tell them there would be a side effect with it, do you think the patient will eventually experience that exact side effect?  You bet.  Many doctors believe that there is more testosterone under the medication than without.  Why not tell patients this?  

If a doctor, without giving enough time to confirm that there will be side effects, does not prescribe the medication it is typically because he is under the strong belief that the medication will either be unsuccessful, or has developed predetermined notion that the medication will eventually result in harm to the patient.  Who's fault is it?  The rep that gave him the info originally?  Is it what you can read on the internet?  (Which brings up the question, who wrote it?).  The fact is, all patients are different, some will experience side effects and some won't.  But how would you know without the patient trying it?

Thanks for bringing up the subject of a medical therapy.  It is a huge component when it comes to hair retention.  Do research, speak with the doctor(s) and decide if is the path you want to take.  Lots to consider, particularly when it is a long-term medication.  Once you're on it, stay on it otherwise you will lose the benefit and and the time and money invested will be wasted.

 

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Thanks lasercap .. I agree with u 💯. U speak facts with wisdom . . The people that I respect most on this forum is u n gillenator.. ur words are gold ! 

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On 4/27/2019 at 12:36 AM, LaserCap said:

Gabreille, let's take your "report" one step at a time....

Finasteride might just be the most misunderstood drug or the most manipulative seducer.   (What are you talking about)?  Proscar, the parent medication, is used to treat prostate issues.  Patients were coming back to their doctor with more hair and this was the beginning of it all.  

Especially when it comes to the part of a physician prescribing it to the patients or not prescribing it, it becomes almost impossible to come out unscathed. One most definitely does not want to be blamed for being the cause of anybody's sexual disintegration

Perhaps it is the specialty of the doctor that dictates their level of knowledge.  I think it is fair to say that a PCP in a family practice would probably know a lot less about hair loss than a hair transplant surgeon that has been dealing with the subject for years.  Perhaps this is the misunderstanding you are referring to?    If you don't know something, ask or refer the patient to someone that does know the answer.  The worse thing that can happen is for a patient to remain uneducated and do nothing.  How many times have we heard "I wish someone would have explained all of this when I still had my hair."

You mention "sexual side effects" throughout your script.  There are other side effects associated with the medication and there always seems to be more come out that had not been discussed previously.  And there have been benefits discussed as well.  The latest I heard, from a doctor that did his thesis on the subject, dealt with possible dementia after years of use.  We'll have to wait and see what comes of this.  For me, I plan to take the medication for the next 200 years.  (Let's bring back the parent medication, Proscar, for a second.  How many millions of patients take this medication, successfully to address prostate issues?  Do you hear of all the side effects they are experiencing?  Consider that this is a 5mg pill, which is 5 times Propecia/Finasteride dose).

The power of the mind is incredible. If I was to give a patient an M&M and tell them there would be a side effect with it, do you think the patient will eventually experience that exact side effect?  You bet.  Many doctors believe that there is more testosterone under the medication than without.  Why not tell patients this?  

If a doctor, without giving enough time to confirm that there will be side effects, does not prescribe the medication it is typically because he is under the strong belief that the medication will either be unsuccessful, or has developed predetermined notion that the medication will eventually result in harm to the patient.  Who's fault is it?  The rep that gave him the info originally?  Is it what you can read on the internet?  (Which brings up the question, who wrote it?).  The fact is, all patients are different, some will experience side effects and some won't.  But how would you know without the patient trying it?

Thanks for bringing up the subject of a medical therapy.  It is a huge component when it comes to hair retention.  Do research, speak with the doctor(s) and decide if is the path you want to take.  Lots to consider, particularly when it is a long-term medication.  Once you're on it, stay on it otherwise you will lose the benefit and and the time and money invested will be wasted.

 

Hello,

Thank you for your amazing feedback.

I wouldn't consider the above article I wrote as a REPORT. I would rather consider it as my experience with this mediation.

Finasteride might just be the most misunderstood drug or the most manipulative seducer.   (What are you talking about)?  Proscar, the parent medication, is used to treat prostate issues.  Patients were coming back to their doctor with more hair and this was the beginning of it all.  

- Hmm... now Proscar... the medication... It functions by decreasing the level of  dihydrotestosterone and this medication is used to treat men with enlarged prostrate. 

The side effects of Proscar are: impotency, loss of interest in sex, trouble having an orgasm, abnormal ejaculation, swelling in your hands or feet, swelling or tenderness in your breasts, dizziness, weakness, feeling faint, headache, runny nose, or skin rash.

These side effects can last even after the patients stop taking the medication. 

It is a parent for Finasteride but it is recommended at a dosage of 5 mg. Almost 100% of the patients if given a choice wouldn't take Finasteride. There is a constant conflict whether they should or should not take the medication. A constant fear that they might experience the side effects. And also a constant desire to do something about their progressing baldness. 

And that is what I was talking about.

Perhaps it is the specialty of the doctor that dictates their level of knowledge.  I think it is fair to say that a PCP in a family practice would probably know a lot less about hair loss than a hair transplant surgeon that has been dealing with the subject for years.  Perhaps this is the misunderstanding you are referring to?    If you don't know something, ask or refer the patient to someone that does know the answer.  The worse thing that can happen is for a patient to remain uneducated and do nothing.  How many times have we heard "I wish someone would have explained all of this when I still had my hair."

- A Doctor is always a Doctor and a patient is always a patient. No matter how much experience we might have in the hair transplant industry or our own research, a Doctor knows best. But a certain fraction of the patients refuse to take Finasteride altogether. They would rather go for more transplantation procedures in the future. In a country like India, where it is a patriarchal society, no man in his right mind would take even the slightest risk of losing his sexual advantage over something as insignificant as hair. It is always wrong if a Doctor does not inform the patient about the prevention of the ongoing hair loss. But it is also most definitely wrong to force a patient or to manipulate a patient to take Finasteride. The free will of an individual must be respected.

You mention "sexual side effects" throughout your script.  There are other side effects associated with the medication and there always seems to be more come out that had not been discussed previously.  And there have been benefits discussed as well.  The latest I heard, from a doctor that did his thesis on the subject, dealt with possible dementia after years of use.  We'll have to wait and see what comes of this.  For me, I plan to take the medication for the next 200 years.  (Let's bring back the parent medication, Proscar, for a second.  How many millions of patients take this medication, successfully to address prostate issues?  Do you hear of all the side effects they are experiencing?  Consider that this is a 5mg pill, which is 5 times Propecia/Finasteride dose).

- The side effect that I have understood that bothers people the most is the one on their sexual functions. Hence, I had decided to jot down on the same. 

The medication  can be used for the treatment of benign enlargement of the prostrate in men but then again it artificially inhibits the PSA levels and it can be instrumental in diagnosing a higher grade of cancer which is more difficult to cure. Infact many people with the history of prostrate cancer in their family avoid the medication altogether.

I have worked with Dementia patients for almost a year. However, the use of this medication and it's curing effects on Dementia have not been scientifically backed up. It is not proved. And it is not used at the moment in normalcy. It is more of a wishful thinking as it seems. 

The power of the mind is incredible. If I was to give a patient an M&M and tell them there would be a side effect with it, do you think the patient will eventually experience that exact side effect?  You bet.  Many doctors believe that there is more testosterone under the medication than without.  Why not tell patients this?

My point exactly. Most patients are not those who would have a lot of research done. Many are vulnerable and 100% trusting of the Doctors. Now it is possible that many of them could experience side effects with Finasteride. It is okay to inform them about the side effects but is it okay to prescribe? Or should there be guidelines prior to the prescription of the medication? Can you give guarantee that all these people will not experience side effects?

If a doctor, without giving enough time to confirm that there will be side effects, does not prescribe the medication it is typically because he is under the strong belief that the medication will either be unsuccessful, or has developed predetermined notion that the medication will eventually result in harm to the patient.  Who's fault is it?  The rep that gave him the info originally?  Is it what you can read on the internet?  (Which brings up the question, who wrote it?).  The fact is, all patients are different, some will experience side effects and some won't.  But how would you know without the patient trying it?

What is the criteria or test to determine a concrete evidence of the side effect being experienced by the patient? Sometimes it could all be just Psychogenic but sometimes it can be all real. What is the time period that a Doctor determines for the "test"? Patients who take Finasteride should most definitely get their sperm count done prior to taking it and afterwards. We cannot deny the fact that this medication does have an effect on the body. And until someone is a Doctor, I do not feel that the individual has a right to prescribe the medication. It should be limited to information sharing. Someone who would push the medication would make me suspicious of the intent. Proscar leaves the side effects after the end of it's consumption sometimes. What is the proof that 
Finasteride will not?

Thank you for your great feedback above. I have myself been taking this medications - Finasteride, for almost 4 years now - 1 mg daily. And I trust it more than life. I am, infact planning to switch to Dutasteride soon. There was a decrease in sperm count and lessened sexual desire in the beginning of my intake. But I have also noticed that the side effects did not last long with me. Don't know why and how.

But I shall forever be skeptical if the medication should be prescribed to the patients or if it a choice that they should freely make. Is it even a medication? Androgenetic alopecia is just a natural phenomenon. It is a normal male characteristic. If you are a male, you are potentially bald. 

And hence, my question intensifies further... is it really something to be prescribed?


Counsellor at Eugenix Hair Sciences

Dr. Arika Bansal & Dr. Pradeep Sethi

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5crlGyTac2hlU1gHneADzQ

 

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