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Will You Suffer From Shock Loss If You Have A Hair Transplant?

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For those of you who have had hair transplants, did you guys suffer from shock loss? I would love to hear the communities input.

 

Will You Suffer From Shock Loss If You Have A Hair Transplant?


I do not provide medical advice, recommendations, all responses are my opinion.

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Melvin- Associate Publisher and Forum Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q&A Blog.

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On 4/25/2019 at 6:44 AM, Melvin-Moderator said:

For those of you who have had hair transplants, did you guys suffer from shock loss? I would love to hear the communities input.

 

Will You Suffer From Shock Loss If You Have A Hair Transplant?

It is normal for patients to suffer from a temporary shock loss after they go through the procedure. Even the shedding of the transplanted follicles could be termed as a form of shock loss. The hair follicles could become thinner or fall off. 

I suffered shock loss too. My donor area had also lost some surrounding hair for some time. However, the shedding has temporary.

We have also seen some patients who grew the hair directly without any shedding of the follicles. Also in some patients we have seen minimal shock loss in the donor area. But I think one must be prepared for the "ugly duckling phase" when one goes for a transplant.

Personal opinion according to what I have experienced and observed.


Counsellor at Eugenix Hair Sciences

Dr. Arika Bansal & Dr. Pradeep Sethi

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5crlGyTac2hlU1gHneADzQ

 

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I had 2 transplants in 2011 and 2018 with no shock loss.  First was FUT and 2nd FUE.


"Imagination frames events unknown in wild fantastic shapes of hideous ruin, and what it fears, creates." Hannah More

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If wrong surgical protocol is used, yes, and the shockloss may not return.  

High surgeon Ethics may prevent such issues.  You really do not suffer from that as it is brutal.  

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The shedding of grafts is not related to shock loss but rather transplanted follicles simply going through their respective growth cycles.

Native hair that is in an advanced stage of diffusion is ultimately at the highest risk of shock loss.

Hair is shocked as a result of how it responds to the level of trauma to the scalp from the surgery.


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Independent Patient Advocate

I am not a physician and not employed by any doctor/clinic. My opinions are not medical advice, but are my own views which you read at your own risk.

Supporting Physicians:  Dr. Robert True & Dr. Robert Dorin, New York, NY

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If you are going to have grafts planted in a diffused area, would it help to get one Fin for a period of time before the procedure? Even if You are not going to stay on it long term?

In other words, just take finasteride before the procedure.

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1 hour ago, ndubya said:

If you are going to have grafts planted in a diffused area, would it help to get one Fin for a period of time before the procedure? Even if You are not going to stay on it long term?

In other words, just take finasteride before the procedure.

Finasteride is for the preservation of your pre existing hair. If you do not take Finasteride after the transplantation (if you have a diffused hair loss) then you would surely lose your pre existing hair in the future. Usually the Doctors stop the use of Finasteride and Minoxidil at least 2 months prior to the transplant to have a clear idea of the area that requires new grafts to be planted. 


Counsellor at Eugenix Hair Sciences

Dr. Arika Bansal & Dr. Pradeep Sethi

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5crlGyTac2hlU1gHneADzQ

 

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I find that temporary shock loss in the donor -- with both FUT and FUE -- is very common. Thankfully, it is almost universally temporary. Sometimes it can "linger" a bit and make patients nervous, but everything should grow back. Permanent shock loss in the recipient zone should be pretty much avoidable. If you do not work in hair that is inappropriately thick, use small tools, use high magnification, and pump the tissue up with a little saline, then you should significantly decrease your chances of experiencing shock loss. Remember it is surgery and anything can happen, but it is typically avoidable. I also believe trimming the hair helps, but I know others do feel differently. 

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I suffrered pretty bad shock loss to the donor shortly after my procedure . Scared the shit out of me at the time , but was reassured by other members that it was likely temporary and would fully recover , which indeed it did .Shock loss is probably a lot more prevalent than some surgeons would like to admit .

Have come across a few stories where the shock loss was permanent , but fortunately seems to be a fairly rare occurence .

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