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FUEblonde1985

Signs of graft survival immediately post transplant?

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I've been trying to google this question and I can't seem to find definitive answer. My question is - how does the immediate growth (or non-growth) of the transplanted follicle have any relation to the graft's viability? IE - does seeing the hair follicle grow out and subsequently shed in the first month indicate that the graft was successful and does the converse necessarily apply - if an implanted follicle does not grow after transplantation - does that indicate that the graft did not survive the transplantation process?

Some surgeons that have posted progress pictures of their patients have noted that "day 10 - we can see all of the implanted follicles slowly growing. I told (patient) that that means those grafts were successful and he's going to have a good result. It's important for patients to understand this since it is expected most of these follicles will shed in the coming weeks."

I haven't been able to find much regarding the contrapositive. If 5-10 post op pictures show just a small tip of a follicle, while the others around it have grown a millimeter or two - does that indicate the graft didn't make it? Is it possible that hair follicles break off at the stem? Are there any other ways to tell if grafts took hold or not?

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I think sometimes it looks like some of the immediate grafts are growing. But actually the hair is being expelled through the surface of the skin as it sheds, giving the appearance of growth

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Also, during the first week there is often swelling and inflammation in the recipient. The transplanted hair can appear to grow as the swelling and inflammation recedes.

Edited by Spaceman

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This is a serious topic and one that merits a bit more discussion. I am guessing that historical info helps here.  If it's successful 100% of the time, it should be successful every time a procedure is done.  But, how can you tell?  Well, magnification and other considerations.......Is doing a test area, particularly when dealing with a condition other than a hereditary one, a good idea?  Of course! Once you see the take you can then decide if the procedure is worth the risk.

Now let's take a normal, every day procedure, (no dealing with a medical condition other than a hereditary one).  Many things need to happen before a viable graft is transplanted.  First, it needs to be harvested.  Did the doctor go all the way down the the base of the follicle? Once out, was it manhandled and damaged because of the way it was dissected?  How about at the time of placing?  Was the graft squeezed too hard? Was it placed at the right depth?

I am aware cases that, without fail, were unsuccessful.  No take.  Non whatsoever.  The doctor did a second procedure because he actually felt bad for the patient.  The second one did not work either.  Doctor had been doing this for 30+ yrs.  Could never figure out what the issue was.  This is the reason why I don't place a lot of value on semantics.  If you've been doing this for 50 years but have been doing it wrong for 50 years, guess what?  It is all about results.  Photos.  So, do your homework. Review HUNDREDS of photos before making a decision to move forward with a transplant procedure.  Donor is limited. Treat it like gold and allow an expert to help you.  I realize trust is a big thing but anyone can say anything at any time to convince you.  

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Ya man this bs saying “there’s no way to tell” is just insane. If im doing anything for 20+ years u better believe i know when grafts have survived or not. Simple as that

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On 2/25/2019 at 10:00 PM, VicTNYC said:

Have you asked your surgeon to see if they have an answer or explanation?

I asked him today - he said we won't know which grafts took until at least after 6 months. Perhaps he just didn't want me to get it in my head that some of the grafts didn't survive so I don't feel bad - or maybe it's just speculation and you can't really know (and don't get me wrong - it appears that a vast majority of my grafts have taken hold. Seems like it would be something that could be empirically verified if someone undertook the study. But it doesn't seem the study has any monetary incentive since its just a study designed to rule out potential customers.

Here's at least one quoted doc from realself:

(in response to question about why transplanted grafts have not shed at the 17 day mark)
 
This is undoubtedly a good sign. Sometimes hairs don't always elongate after transplantation and simply "fall out"

No study has ever been done but I do believe hairs that elongate (lengthen) post transplant are extremely healthy and will have high survival. 
 
Edited by FUEblonde1985

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On 2/26/2019 at 4:44 PM, bman3082 said:

But how can we tell if it survived? My hairs seemed to shed very very early

I have wondered if the hairs that shed quickly have done so due to a lack of oxygen during the surgery or if the blood vessels do not repair in the recipient area as quickly as others. Or perhaps they were closer to the telogen phase anyway. Or perhaps they were just more robust in the first place. Yes there could be an empirical study of some kind but there are so many variables to consider. Therefore it would be very hard, if not impossible, to prove causality. Ultimately, of course, you will know which survived and which didn't at the 12 month stage and that is what matters

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