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Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration Patient RSI had a Robotic Hair Transplant using the ARTAS Robotic Hair Transplant System, consisting of 1,930 grafts. He was a Norwood Class 4A with brown, wavy, medium-fine hair and a donor density of 2.7.

 

 

Overview:

 

beforeafter_fb_rsi.jpg

 

 

Before / After:

 

 

0a_before_rsi.jpg

Before Hair Transplant

 

 

0b_after_rsi.jpg

After One Hair Transplant

 

 

 

Detail of Hairline:

 

The images below demonstrate the various steps in an FUE procedure. The patient elected to have his head shaved for the procedure but the marketing to definite the recipient area was made before his head was shaven because the existing hair serves as a guide to the doctor as to where to place the newly transplanted hair.

 

1a_before_rsi.jpg

Before Transplant

 

 

1b_planned-hairline_rsi.jpg

Position of Hairline

 

 

1c_hair-clipped_rsi.jpg

Hair Clipped

 

 

1d_1930-grafts-placed_rsi.jpg

Grafts Placed

 

 

1e_11-days-post-op_rsi.jpg

11 Days Post-op

 

 

1f_1-year-after-hair-transplant_rsi.jpg

1 year After Hair Transplant

 

 

 

Donor Area:

 

The images below show the donor harvest using the ARTAS Robotic Hair Transplant System. The first IMG shows a slanted scar in the donor area that he patient had as a child. The ARTAS robot has been programmed to avoid this scar while harvesting. As displayed in the second photo, grafts were placed into the scar to camouflage it. The third photo illustrates the donor area 11 days after the surgery.

 

 

2a_donor-area-with-scar_rsi.jpg

Donor Area Showing Scar

 

 

2b_harvest-avoiding-scar_rsi.jpg

After Harvesting and Placement of Grafts

 

 

2c_11-days-post-op_rsi.jpg

11 Days Post-op

 

 

See patients with similar characteristics in the Bernstein Medical photo galleries:

 

 

 

 

Additional Resources:

 


Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration

110 East 55th Street, 11th Floor

New York, NY 10022

212-826-2400 • contact@bernsteinmedical.com

_____________________________________________

 

Dr. Bernstein is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians

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This is a amazing result, low graft count ,huge change in appearance,great coverage, great job by doc and staff,

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Honestly, the result is good but I do not like the extratction pattern. It is very "concentrated" and even.

The human eye is very sensitive for such patterns. With short hair or when he ages it might be visible.

 

A have seens These "extraction Patterns quite often in "Artas Cases".

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Weird, no further comment from the clinic? How can you have such an extraction pattern? If there is no medical reason this looks like a serious drawback of the artas or a mishandling of the machine to me.

 

In what way?


Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration

110 East 55th Street, 11th Floor

New York, NY 10022

212-826-2400 • contact@bernsteinmedical.com

_____________________________________________

 

Dr. Bernstein is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians

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In what way?

 

Thank you for the reply.

 

My understanding is, that the FUE extraction is performed in a way that (despite the produced scar tissue and thinning) it cannot be detected.

 

Therfore, the top clinics distribute the pattern evently starting from the safe zone and fading out on the sides.

 

The Artas results I know (including this one) show a smaller (especially on the side) extraction area and a very (!) hard edges (no transition from extraction to non extraction area).

 

From my standpoint this lead to a much higher risk to detect the surgery. The human eye is trained on such unnatural patterns and there will be a sudden change in density. Actually I wonder, if the patient would feel the difference when touching/cimbing the area.

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Thank you for the reply.

 

My understanding is, that the FUE extraction is performed in a way that (despite the produced scar tissue and thinning) it cannot be detected.

 

Therfore, the top clinics distribute the pattern evently starting from the safe zone and fading out on the sides.

 

The Artas results I know (including this one) show a smaller (especially on the side) extraction area and a very (!) hard edges (no transition from extraction to non extraction area).

 

From my standpoint this lead to a much higher risk to detect the surgery. The human eye is trained on such unnatural patterns and there will be a sudden change in density. Actually I wonder, if the patient would feel the difference when touching/cimbing the area.

 

Excellent comments. Feathering of the extraction zone in FUE is a technique where the distance between the extractions gradually increases as one reaches the border of the extracted zone. When this technique should be used depends upon the short- and long-term goals of the patient. If the patient’s main goal of the FUE procedure is to wear their hair very short, then the technique of feathering and rounding the edges to have a less distinct border is appropriate, as this will decrease the visibility of the harvested area.

 

However, if a person does not wear his hair very short (nor plans to) and maximizing the donor supply is paramount, then a more organized pattern, with less feathering, will give a greater long-term yield and a more even distribution. The reason is that the healing of FUE wounds distorts adjacent follicular units making subsequent extraction in the same regions more difficult and increases the risk of transection. For this reason, in subsequent procedures we generally prefer to harvest in new areas. If we need to harvest more hair from the same area, we rarely go back more than once.

 

When one feathers extensively in the donor area, this utilizes a larger surface area of the scalp with less graft yield, so it may become necessary to go back over the same area to obtain additional grafts, often multiple times. This risks increased transection and an uneven, mottled appearance to the donor area.

 

If a person wears his hair very short, then feathering is critical (even though it makes subsequent extraction more problematic). It is very easy to feather and round edges with the ARTAS robot, but we make the decision to do so based upon the specific needs and goals of the patient.


Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration

110 East 55th Street, 11th Floor

New York, NY 10022

212-826-2400 • contact@bernsteinmedical.com

_____________________________________________

 

Dr. Bernstein is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians

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Great comment from Gasthoerer, and what would appear to me (I'm no expert) to be an excellent explanation from Dr Bernstein. Thanks guys, feel I have expanded my knowledge in the dizzy world of HT.


5024 grafts with Asmed Clinic. Dr Koray 25th & 26th Oct 2017

 

Those who spend their time looking for the faults in others usually make no time to correct their own. –Art Janak

 

 

http://www.hairrestorationnetwork.com/eve/187649-countdown-my-hair-transplant.html

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Thank you very much for the detailed explanation.

 

To sum it up:

- According to you "feathering" would be possible with Artas

- You didn't perform this method for this particular case, as you want to save virgin donor area

- This requires longer hair in the donor region

- You would have done similiar with Manual extaction, correct?

 

This explanations sounds logical, even though I am sure there are other opinions (as always). Also, I would really like to see a "feathering" donor with the Artas. Furthermore, if you use a concentrated pattern, wouldn't FUT be the prefered option. If there is no Intention to wear the hair short...

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a more organized pattern, with less feathering, will give a greater long-term yield and a more even distribution. The reason is that the healing of FUE wounds distorts adjacent follicular units making subsequent extraction in the same regions more difficult and increases the risk of transection. For this reason, in subsequent procedures we generally prefer to harvest in new areas..

 

Has there been any studies on this or is it more just an observation doctors have made? And when you say distort do you mean the adjacent follicles are actually damaged/compromised post-op or just that when you try to extract them in the future it may be more risky?

 

Would be really interested to hear from docs who've done multiple medium-large size FUE sessions and if they notice a lower yield the second time around.

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Thank you very much for the detailed explanation.

 

To sum it up:

- According to you "feathering" would be possible with Artas

- You didn't perform this method for this particular case, as you want to save virgin donor area

- This requires longer hair in the donor region

- You would have done similiar with Manual extaction, correct?

 

This explanations sounds logical, even though I am sure there are other opinions (as always). Also, I would really like to see a "feathering" donor with the Artas. Furthermore, if you use a concentrated pattern, wouldn't FUT be the prefered option. If there is no Intention to wear the hair short...

 

Yes, FUT would be the preferred option, but some patients just don’t want a strip. And patient’s may change their minds in the future and may want to cut their hair short. It is much easier to create additional feathering than to have to camouflage a linear donor scar.

 

Has there been any studies on this or is it more just an observation doctors have made? And when you say distort do you mean the adjacent follicles are actually damaged/compromised post-op or just that when you try to extract them in the future it may be more risky?

 

Would be really interested to hear from docs who've done multiple medium-large size FUE sessions and if they notice a lower yield the second time around.

 

This is from observation. More difficult to extract.


Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration

110 East 55th Street, 11th Floor

New York, NY 10022

212-826-2400 • contact@bernsteinmedical.com

_____________________________________________

 

Dr. Bernstein is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians

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Photos taken from Patient RSI's two year follow up showing the detail of his donor area and the change in hair texture from the first to second-year post-op.

 

1g_2-years-after-hair-transplant_rsi.jpg

2 Years After Hair Transplant

 

 

2d_2-years-post-op_rsi.jpg

2 Years After Hair Transplant - Donor Area

 

 

2e_hair-combed-up-2-years-after_rsi.jpg

Hair Combed Up Showing Detail of Donor Area[/size


Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration

110 East 55th Street, 11th Floor

New York, NY 10022

212-826-2400 • contact@bernsteinmedical.com

_____________________________________________

 

Dr. Bernstein is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians

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