Jump to content
bigwilly1234

Transplanted hair unmanageable kinky straw like hair

Recommended Posts

I'm noticing that my transplanted hair does not match the rest of my hair. my original hair is nice and straight. But my transplanted hair that grew in are unmanageable strands of hair that are Wavy. does this stay like this or will it eventually grow to match my regular hair it's like each strand of hair has a mind of its own. My hair always looks messy because of this. Just wondering if this is common or if anybody else heard of this before. I'm 1yr post op.

20150801_183652.jpg.79c64928a5d42252165106c0abea3464.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

Usually from what Ive read, the transplanted hair will straighten out. I would give it a little more time. What kind of transplant was it FUE/FUT?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is quite common and the hair should eventually take on the appearance of your natural hair in time. I had the same experience with my first two transplants.


David - Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant

 

I am not a medical professional. All opinions are my own and my advice should not constitute as medical advice.

 

View my Hair Loss Website

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Willy,

 

Just to clarify: the procedure was performed in 2013 and you underwent FUE, correct?


Dr. Blake Bloxham is recommended by the Hair Transplant Network.

 

 

Hair restoration physician - Feller and Bloxham Hair Transplantation

 

Previously "Future_HT_Doc" or "Blake_Bloxham" - forum co-moderator and editorial assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, Hair Restoration Network, Hair Loss Q&A blog, and Hair Loss Learning Center.

 

Click here to read my previous answers to hair loss and hair restoration questions, editorials, commentaries, and educational articles.

 

Now practicing hair transplant surgery with Coalition hair restoration physician Dr Alan Feller at our New York practice: Feller and Bloxham Hair Transplantation.

 

Please note: my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I had a FUE in 2013. Its been about a year and a half. And the hair is kinky and has a mind of its own. Its been a while so I'm concerned. Thanks guys for getting back to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Willy,

 

Thanks for sharing.

 

So, here's the deal: I'm going to tell you my opinion of what I think happened, and you'll let me know what you think and ask any additional questions.

 

By 18 months post-op*, your grafts are fully matured. By "matured" I mean that the characteristics of your hair follicles and the hairs they produce are set in stone.

 

For the first 3-9 months after a hair transplant procedure, we often see the "kinky" and "wiry" hairs you're describing. The internal portion of the hair follicle is what determines how the hair grows. Straight, curly, thick, thin, wiry, and kinky; this is determined by the internal portion of the follicle. During a hair transplant procedure, this internal portion of the follicle often becomes temporarily distorted. As a result, the hairs grow kinky and wiry until the internal portion of the follicle rights itself and starts producing normal hairs.

 

Now, the information I've described above holds true for strip procedures. However, I've witnessed something different in FUE patients: permanent kinky, wiry hairs that retain these characteristics indefinitely. In my opinion, this occurs because the stresses grafts experience during the FUE extraction process causes permanent damage and distortion to the follicle. This includes the internal portion of the follicle. Which, as I explained above, results in permanently altered hairs.

 

Hopefully you'll see some normalization. But I've unfortunately seen a number of these permanently distorted growth cases in post-FUE patients. Does the hair provide good coverage? What does it look like cut short? This is always an option.

 

Read this over and see if it makes sense to you. Feel free to ask any additional questions.

 

*PS: based on your posting history, it looks like you actually underwent the procedure in early February or late January of 2013. This would make you closer to 2 and a half years, not 1 and a half years post-op? Does this sound right?


Dr. Blake Bloxham is recommended by the Hair Transplant Network.

 

 

Hair restoration physician - Feller and Bloxham Hair Transplantation

 

Previously "Future_HT_Doc" or "Blake_Bloxham" - forum co-moderator and editorial assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, Hair Restoration Network, Hair Loss Q&A blog, and Hair Loss Learning Center.

 

Click here to read my previous answers to hair loss and hair restoration questions, editorials, commentaries, and educational articles.

 

Now practicing hair transplant surgery with Coalition hair restoration physician Dr Alan Feller at our New York practice: Feller and Bloxham Hair Transplantation.

 

Please note: my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. Thank you. My first procedure was two and a half years ago. My second procedure was about a year and a half ago. I'm in fact getting a third procedure in a few days but I'm doing the strip method. You said this doesnt happen permanently when you do strip correct? But yea I think the grafts are damaged. Its been a year and a half. Is it common for this to happen. I went to dr.Diep. who is said to do good work. But I notice that his technicians are doing most of the work. he starts the procedure but then it seems like most of the work is being done by the technicians. But maybe that's normal I wouldn't know. If I wanted his quality work wouldn't he be doing it. Do other doctors offices do hair transplants with mostly their technicians doing all the work? Or does the doctor actually do the transplant himself the whole time? Anyway thanks for getting back to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bigwilly before anyone jumps on the FUE cause more stress / damage argument, take a look at your own hair, your hair is long, very long, longer than most girls grow their hair, perhaps you have over estimated the limitations on what HT FUT or FUE can actually achieve. I don't see this a Dr Diep's fault or fault of the technicians. Maybe go to a female hair salon and ask for some damage hair shampoo's or some moisturizer shampoo. As we get older our hair also tends to kink the longer we grow it, I know i can't grow a pony tail like I did when I was in my 20's, it would just look wrong


June 2013 - 3000 FUE Dr Bhatti

Oct 2013 - 1000 FUE Dr Bhatti

Oct 2015 - 785 FUE Dr Bhatti

 

Dr. Bhatti's Recommendation Profile on the Hair Transplant Network

My story and photos can be seen here

http://www.hairrestorationnetwork.com/Sethticles/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Big willy, it's hard to judge if the hair does not match the other hair, you've only posted a pic of a few strands of hair, how about posting a picture of your whole head so we can actually have a comparison between the donor area and the top, also I must say, if the grafts are stressed or damaged they most likely would not grow, there is absolutely no reason why the hair would not match.

 

Additionally, as stated by sethticles, your hair is as long as most women wear their hair, a quick google search of split ends will pull up images of what appears to be wrong with your hair. I have also had a transplant with Dr. Diep, he does good work, but I do agree that some technicians need to be trained more thoroughly, honestly, I don't think I would return for another transplant with him, but that's more to do with price rather than overall result. The only difference with FUE and FUT is method of extraction, there should be no reason why one method would change the characteristics of your hair I don't think there is any scientific evidence to substantiate that theory.


I do not provide medical advice, recommendations, all responses are my opinion.

My Hair Transplant Journey

Melvin- Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q&A Blog.

Follow our Social Media Instagram @thehairtransplantnetwork FacebookPintrest, Linkedin and YouTube.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"it's hard to judge if the hair does not match the other hair, you've only posted a pic of a few strands of hair how about posting a picture of your whole head"

 

HTSoon, He's not asking for our opinion on whether or not his HT is kinky, he's telling us it is, so I don't think he needs to post more pictures.

 

"The only difference with FUE and FUT is method of extraction also I must say, if the grafts are stressed or damaged they most likely would not grow, there is absolutely no reason why the hair would not match."

 

That is in fact the big difference between the two surgeries and precisely the reason it makes sense that the hair quality can be different as Blake just explained.

 

I've actually seen this happen to a SMP client I worked on recently. He had both strip and FUE surgeries (both done by the same qualified HT surgeon). The latter to address two small, specific spots. The client complained that the FUE hair was kinky and did not match his other transplant/native hair, and it certainly looked and felt like a different quality to me as well.

 

Willy, I agree with the assessment that if it's been two years your hair is done maturing and you will not see the big change in quality at this point. That being said, you can always try to deep condition it, or even soften it with a treatment. I would suggest going to a salon that does keratin treatments. If you try at home, go with a non-Lye product like the Olive Oil straighteners they sell at drug stores. I've tried a few of them (I have very wavy kinky hair) and they do help.


I am the owner/operator of AHEAD INK a temporary/non-permanent Scalp Micropigmentation Company in the New York area. AHEAD INK is a Milena Lardi trained clinic and uses Beauty Medical equipment and products exclusively.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"it's hard to judge if the hair does not match the other hair, you've only posted a pic of a few strands of hair how about posting a picture of your whole head"

 

HTSoon, He's not asking for our opinion on whether or not his HT is kinky, he's telling us it is, so I don't think he needs to post more pictures.

 

"The only difference with FUE and FUT is method of extraction also I must say, if the grafts are stressed or damaged they most likely would not grow, there is absolutely no reason why the hair would not match."

 

That is in fact the big difference between the two surgeries and precisely the reason it makes sense that the hair quality can be different as Blake just explained.

 

I've actually seen this happen to a SMP client I worked on recently. He had both strip and FUE surgeries (both done by the same qualified HT surgeon). The latter to address two small, specific spots. The client complained that the FUE hair was kinky and did not match his other transplant/native hair, and it certainly looked and felt like a different quality to me as well.

 

Willy, I agree with the assessment that if it's been two years your hair is done maturing and you will not see the big change in quality at this point. That being said, you can always try to deep condition it, or even soften it with a treatment. I would suggest going to a salon that does keratin treatments. If you try at home, go with a non-Lye product like the Olive Oil straighteners they sell at drug stores. I've tried a few of them (I have very wavy kinky hair) and they do help.

 

If the follicular unit is damaged or stressed during transplantation it simply wont grow, FUE does not change the characteristics of ones hair, show me scientific evidence of this or studies conducted that substantiate your claims and then we can have an open discussion. Furthermore, it appears that his hair has damaged split ends, could be from nizoral shampoo that dries out the hair and actually damages the hair, with little information it's not really possible to make an appropriate assessment that's why I had asked for a better picture of the full head.

 

Additionally, if it were true that FUE changes ones hair characteristics there would be more documented cases, i've had two FUE procedures neither of which have changed any of may hair characteristics. This is literally the first time i've ever seen anyone claim that their hair has changed from the procedure. I encourage everyone to do their own research before making their decision on which procedure to choose, there is no right or wrong or one size fits all, it is basically what best fits your goals. Also, it is best to see who is endorsing the procedures, patients or physicians selling their products just my two cents:)


I do not provide medical advice, recommendations, all responses are my opinion.

My Hair Transplant Journey

Melvin- Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q&A Blog.

Follow our Social Media Instagram @thehairtransplantnetwork FacebookPintrest, Linkedin and YouTube.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey HTSoon,

To be clear, I wasn't advocating for strip over FUE, and I didn't think that was the thrust of this thread. In fact, I've had both types of surgeries myself and both went off without a hitch. I was simply commenting on the poster's complaint and Blake's explanation/observation.

 

"...show me scientific evidence of this or studies conducted that substantiate your claims and then we can have an open discussion..."

 

I'm not sure why I have to substantiate what I saw with my own two eyes. You can choose to believe me or not. I'm also not saying this will be the case with every FUE surgery, but I don't believe this was necessarily a one-time occurrence especially after hearing Blake's explanation and the fact that he's observed this happen to other patients.

 

I do agree with your closing sentiment that one size does not fit all, and everyone considering any type of elective surgery should do their due diligence and weigh out all the risks.

Edited by hairthere

I am the owner/operator of AHEAD INK a temporary/non-permanent Scalp Micropigmentation Company in the New York area. AHEAD INK is a Milena Lardi trained clinic and uses Beauty Medical equipment and products exclusively.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Willy,

 

Hope you found the information informative!

 

This should not happen with strip. There will be some "kink" and "wiry" character to the hairs initially. But this will normalize after around the 9 month mark. I do not believe strip extraction puts the grafts under the same level of strain and, therefore, does not cause permanent damage to the internal portion of the follicle.

 

Is it common for this to happen with FUE? Good question. I don't know if I'd call it common. But I also wouldn't call it uncommon. I think it's best described as "under reported." In fact, I first mentioned this on the boards only a few months ago. I don't think most had even heard this phenomenon described before, and many probably still have some doubts. But if you really review the explanation I posted above, it makes physiological sense.

 

I don't think this has anything to do with Dr Diep. It has to do with the nature of FUE in general. No matter how gently the grafts are removed, they will always be subjected to crushing, twisting, crumpling, and pulling, and this is what will cause the permanent deformity of the internal portion of the follicle.

 

Technicians will always be heavily involved. You actually want a lot of technicians as long as the doctor is performing the actual surgery (IE no "technician FUE") and the techs are doing what they are supposed to do -- dissecting and placing.

 

I also don't think this is "split ends" or trichoptilosis. This is an entire different etiology of hair shaft damage/deformity, and wouldn't really occur unless you were doing heavy hair treatments.

 

Here's an example of true trichoptilosis:

 

rambut.jpg

 

As you can see, this is either caused by a genetic shaft abnormality or chemical/mechanical damage, but it only affects the ends of the hair. You have this kink throughout the entire hair, so it's not from "split ends."


Dr. Blake Bloxham is recommended by the Hair Transplant Network.

 

 

Hair restoration physician - Feller and Bloxham Hair Transplantation

 

Previously "Future_HT_Doc" or "Blake_Bloxham" - forum co-moderator and editorial assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, Hair Restoration Network, Hair Loss Q&A blog, and Hair Loss Learning Center.

 

Click here to read my previous answers to hair loss and hair restoration questions, editorials, commentaries, and educational articles.

 

Now practicing hair transplant surgery with Coalition hair restoration physician Dr Alan Feller at our New York practice: Feller and Bloxham Hair Transplantation.

 

Please note: my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blake,

 

This was the exact opposite of my experience. My hair was kinky and straw-like for a time after each of my strip surgeries. It has not occurred after my FUE.

 

It's my understanding that this can occur due to issues with how the grafts are implanted as well. Is this not the case?

 

At any rate, it seems in most of the cases I've seen, this kinky appearance resolves itself in time.

 

One possible solution in the meantime may be to use a home perm solution. I used to do this years ago to tame unruly hair when I was growing my hair long. It works like a charm. You apply the solution as directly but gently comb the hair straight and allow it to process.

 

Care must be taken! If you over process it or comb it too forcefully, the har can break. It's best to get somene experienced to assist.

Edited by David - Moderator

David - Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant

 

I am not a medical professional. All opinions are my own and my advice should not constitute as medical advice.

 

View my Hair Loss Website

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave,

 

It can occur in either procedure if the graft is crushed during placement or if it's forced into slit sites that are too small. However, it can only really happen during the extraction process with FUE.


Dr. Blake Bloxham is recommended by the Hair Transplant Network.

 

 

Hair restoration physician - Feller and Bloxham Hair Transplantation

 

Previously "Future_HT_Doc" or "Blake_Bloxham" - forum co-moderator and editorial assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, Hair Restoration Network, Hair Loss Q&A blog, and Hair Loss Learning Center.

 

Click here to read my previous answers to hair loss and hair restoration questions, editorials, commentaries, and educational articles.

 

Now practicing hair transplant surgery with Coalition hair restoration physician Dr Alan Feller at our New York practice: Feller and Bloxham Hair Transplantation.

 

Please note: my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One possible solution in the meantime may be to sue a home perm solution.

 

Dave,

You should check out the Olive Oil straightener I mentioned above. They are much less harsh than lye based products and don't cause much breakage from my experience. The only odd part is they are marketed at African American woman so you might feel a bit awkward at checkout!


I am the owner/operator of AHEAD INK a temporary/non-permanent Scalp Micropigmentation Company in the New York area. AHEAD INK is a Milena Lardi trained clinic and uses Beauty Medical equipment and products exclusively.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One possible solution in the meantime may be to sue a home perm solution.

 

Dave,

You should check out the Olive Oil straightener I mentioned above. They are much less harsh than lye based products and don't cause much breakage from my experience. The only odd part is they are marketed at African American woman so you might feel a bit awkward at checkout!

 

That sounds interesting! I don't need it anymore. That is unless I start to grow my hair out again. I'll pass that info on to my wife though. She's been searching for an effective alternative to rebonding to straighten her hair.


David - Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant

 

I am not a medical professional. All opinions are my own and my advice should not constitute as medical advice.

 

View my Hair Loss Website

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×