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Blake Bloxham

Bone Marrow Drug (Ruxolitnib) Regrows Hair in Alopecia Areata

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More exciting news for alopecia areata sufferers!

 

Two months ago, news broke that tofacitinib citrate – a rheumatoid arthritis drug – regrew a full head of hair in a patient suffering from alopecia areata. Now, it appears as if alopecia areata sufferers have more cause for celebration: Earlier today, Columbia University Medical Center announced that ruxolitinib, a drug used to treat a bone marrow disorder called myelofibrosis, restored hair in patients suffering from alopecia areata.

 

AA-before-and-after.jpg

 

The research team tested one of these drugs, ruxolitinib, in mice with alopecia areata and found reversal of baldness and restoration of hair within 12 weeks. The researchers continued with a small trial in human patients suffering from alopecia areata. Participants with “moderate-to-severe” (more than 30% scalp alopecia) enrolled in the trial. After 4-5 months of treatment, the research team found a complete restoration of hair and an absence of immune cells (which cause the alopecia) in the patient’s scalp.

 

Interested in reading more? Please see the following: Bone Marrow Drug Regrows Hair in Alopecia Areata Patients


"Doc" Blake Bloxham - formerly "Future_HT_Doc"

 

Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

 

All opinions are my own and my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

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Blake,

 

Thanks for providing the community with this update. This seems like pretty big news as there are a number of men and women who suffer from alopecia areata hair loss. It'll be interesting to see if this treatment becomes fully available and how effective it is over time.

 

Best wishes,

 

Bill

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Alpoecia areata is a different type of hairloss the overwhelming majorty of us suffer from, right? Alopecia areata is a rare condition in which the immune system mistakenly attacks hair follicbles causing hair to fall out in patches, correct?

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Alpoecia areata is a different type of hairloss the overwhelming majorty of us suffer from, right? Alopecia areata is a rare condition in which the immune system mistakenly attacks hair follicbles causing hair to fall out in patches, correct?

 

That's correct. It's an autoimmune disease. Thus the hair loss is not the result of the action of DHT on the follicle as it is with androgenic alopecia.

 

Though it's certainly exciting news, it probably holds no promise for most of us.


David - Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant

 

I am not a medical professional. All opinions are my own and my advice should not constitute as medical advice.

 

View my Hair Loss Website

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Hi Guys,

 

alopecia areata, like David said, is different from androgenic alopecia. Because alopecia areata is caused by an autoimmune process and not a hormonal process (though androgenic alopecia does involve immune mediated inflammation as well), these new treatments would not work for those with androgenic alopecia or male pattern hair loss. It is great news, however, for those who suffer from alopecia areata!


"Doc" Blake Bloxham - formerly "Future_HT_Doc"

 

Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

 

All opinions are my own and my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

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