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will my hairloss follow my dads


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dad is a nw3 at 50 years old. i am 22 years old right now and definitely have lost some hair.. probably a nw2 now. i already had a pretty big forehead before but now its huge. brother who is 1 year younger has no visible sign of hairloss. i have been weight training for the past 5 years and he has not, i firmly believe that there is a correlation between weight training and accelerated hair loss. raised dht levels or whatever. this will not stop me from weight training though. mothers side brothers all have strong hairlines (wish i got that gene instead)

 

is it most likely that im going to follow my fathers path? what are the chances i can go bald?

Edited by thebossman
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if you are noticing hairloss at 22 then it doesn't look good

will you go completely bald?

and by what age?

no one knows for sure

 

my friend has a full head of thick hair at 40

his brother diffuse balding at 35

their dad was a cue ball growing up

their grand dad died at 90 with hair that resembled a shag rug atop of his head

 

so you just never know.....

 

if your really want an educated guess, you can go to one of the recommended surgeons here for an evaluation and possibly get on finesteride and regaine to halt the process and most likely grow some back and more

 

if you are noticing loss get on the meds sooner rather than later

 

good luck

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Generally speaking the hair loss pattern of your father isn't a very reliable indicator of what yours will be. In all probability you will have hair similar to your father's. But the key words are "similar" and "in all probability." Anything can happen.

 

You can get a better idea of how probable this is by examining old pictures of your father's hair. If his hairline and hair characteristics are the same as yours when he was your age, then more than likely I'd say you'll have similar hair at his current age.

 

It would also be a good idea to have your hair analyzed by a hair specialist and learn how much miniaturization you have and what you can expect in the near future. And of course, if you're serious about stopping hair loss you should get on treatments to invest in the future of your hair.

 

Personally I don't think lifting has a significant impact on hair. I am a NW2 and lift/exercise regularly, yet my brother is basically bald and doesn't exercise at all. And my father has hair similar to your fathers. It's mostly a roll of the dice. That's genetics.

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You need to possibly address this now as options are available to slow cease or regrow hair if lucky. Propecia is FDA approved for hair loss as well as Minox. HT is last option

Edited by voipman
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There is zero correlation between weight training and hair loss. The MPB likely comes from your dad's genes.

I am the owner/operator of AHEAD INK a Scalp Micropigmentation Company in the New York area. AHEAD INK is a Milena Lardi trained clinic and uses Beauty Medical Tricopigmentation equipment and products exclusively.

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All speculative. Its primarily down to genes. Its more probable you will have a combination of your mothers and fathers hair characteristics.

 

It just plain bad luck if the MPB gene from one side. I had my fathers good quality hair but inherited the MPB gene from my mothers side but thankfully it only affected a small area at the front. The rest has remained strong robust hair. (My mothers brothers are top Norwoods where as my father is norwood 1).

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There is zero correlation between weight training and hair loss. The MPB likely comes from your dad's genes.

 

How is there no correlation? We know weight training raises testosterone levels and higher test levels means higher dht levels. Of course this only applies if you are prone to MPB

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Because studies have shown that it's not the levels of DHT in your body that cause MPB, it's the sensitivity of your follicles to DHT. And that's determined by genetics. They have found that even slight levels of Dht will cause hairloss if the follicle receptors are sensitive.

Edited by hairthere

I am the owner/operator of AHEAD INK a Scalp Micropigmentation Company in the New York area. AHEAD INK is a Milena Lardi trained clinic and uses Beauty Medical Tricopigmentation equipment and products exclusively.

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well that is pretty much what i just said. obviously you have to be prone to mpb before dht levels affect your hair. if a slight amount of dht would cause hairloss to follicles that are prone. imagine a high amount of dht exposed to these follices, i'm sure it would speed up the process. which is what weight training does, increases dht.

 

weight training would not cause you to lose hair but will speed the process up, IF you are prone to male pattern baldness or in other terms have follices that are DHT sensitive. that is what i am trying to say

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You're not getting it. It does not matter what your DHT levels are. It has nothing to do with having too much DHT. You could have DHT levels through the roof or you could have a minuscule level of DHT. If your hair follicle receptors are programmed to be susceptible to DHT because of genetics you will lose hair. Think of it this way; if someone holds your head under a foot of water, you're gonna drown, just like if they held you down in a pool of water. The outcome is the same no matter how much DHT is present. Get it?

I am the owner/operator of AHEAD INK a Scalp Micropigmentation Company in the New York area. AHEAD INK is a Milena Lardi trained clinic and uses Beauty Medical Tricopigmentation equipment and products exclusively.

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i think you dont get what i'm trying to say. i'm saying if you have follices that are sensitive, weight training will speed the process of hairloss by increasing dht levels. this has nothing to do with whether or not high dht levels CAUSE hairloss or not. i am saying if you are going to LOSE hair eventually then HIGHER dht levels will speed this process up because you already have follices that are sensitive.

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You're not getting it. It does not matter what your DHT levels are. It has nothing to do with having too much DHT. You could have DHT levels through the roof or you could have a minuscule level of DHT. If your hair follicle receptors are programmed to be susceptible to DHT because of genetics you will lose hair. Think of it this way; if someone holds your head under a foot of water, you're gonna drown, just like if they held you down in a pool of water. The outcome is the same no matter how much DHT is present. Get it?

 

If DHT levels are irrelevant then why does Fin, which reduces DHT levels, unanimously work?

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That's a valid question Rootz. I'm searching for the study I saw that backs my point....

I am the owner/operator of AHEAD INK a Scalp Micropigmentation Company in the New York area. AHEAD INK is a Milena Lardi trained clinic and uses Beauty Medical Tricopigmentation equipment and products exclusively.

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The way I like to think of it is genetics determines a DHT threshold for certain hairs (hairline and crown) and this value is dynamic. That is, the threshold lowers with age. Where the threshold starts and how quickly it lowers is determined by genetics. But once the threshold for a particular hair follicle is reached or exceeded by our DHT level, the affected follicle begins to miniaturize... then eventually fall out and become permanently dormant.

 

For some unlucky guys, as soon as they start hitting puberty their DHT levels are already meeting or exceeding the DHT threshold value of a bunch of follicles. These are the guys who are NW3 by age 20, NW6 by 30, then NW7 by 35. Then there are the lucky ones who start out with a high threshold which remains fairly constant througout the years and are still NW1 at 50 i.e. Brad Pitt.

 

But by altering our DHT levels we can stay under our genetic threshold curve sort of speak and preserve hair. This is why I believe Fin is so effective. Fin won't bring back follicles that are already permanently dormant, but it effectively preserves hair.

 

With that said I do believe lifting does affect hair loss. Based on a study I read it can raise DHT levels by 10-15%... but if you start losing hair from lifting, you probably would have started to lose the same hair in a few years anyways. By comparison, Fin reduces DHT by 60-70%.

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I guess it all depends on the study you read, because I've read studies that say testosterone levels are marginally raised from lifting. Taking steroids on the other hand can raise them dramatically of course. I also found out that Dutasteride can reduce DHT by 90%. Still looking for the study I mentioned previously. I had read it in the past year and it was performed recently.

I am the owner/operator of AHEAD INK a Scalp Micropigmentation Company in the New York area. AHEAD INK is a Milena Lardi trained clinic and uses Beauty Medical Tricopigmentation equipment and products exclusively.

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How is there no correlation? We know weight training raises testosterone levels and higher test levels means higher dht levels. Of course this only applies if you are prone to MPB

 

When I stared losing hair at 16, I had not lifted a single dumbbell or done any kind of weight training.

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I also found out that Dutasteride can reduce DHT by 90%.

 

That stuff is too extreme for me, I wouldn't feel comfortable reducing my DHT by that much. I feel like it's asking for trouble.

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Hey thebossman - can you send me a private message? I was in the same situation but managed to naturally reverse hair loss and want to share some info I wrote with you. A lot of research suggests the issue runs much deeper than DHT. There are specific reactions in your body making those follicles more sensitive, and if you avoid triggering them, you stop future hair loss. You can be genetically prone to developing the sensitivity, but that doesn't mean you can't stop it from happening.

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i never noticed a correlation between hair loss and weight lifting.. and trust me, it has been my on my radar- i would have noticed.

 

im 32 and my i was a nw5a before my HT. my hair loss followed my maternal uncle's side. dad has full head of hair- my brother got my dad's genes, in the sense that 26 y/o brother has no hair loss at all.

Paulygon is a former patient of Dr. Parsa Mohebi

 

My regimen includes:

HT #1 2710 grafts at Parsa Mohebi Hair Restoration in Los Angeles in 2012

Rogaine foam 2x daily, since 2012 (stopped ~10/2015)

Finasteride 1.25mg daily, since 2012 (stopped ~12/2015)

 

HT #2 3238 grafts at Parsa Mohebi Hair Restoration in Los Angeles in Jun. 2016

Started Rogaine and Propecia in July. 2016 after being off of them for about a year.

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Lifting weights and sports helped me keep a strong outlook on life despite receding in the front.

I often wondered if the weights were for bad for my hair, but even if I knew it I probably would have kept on lifting and doing sports anyway. Feeling strong is feeling confident.

go dense or go home

 

Unbiased advice and opinions based on 25 plus years of researching and actual experience with hair loss, hair restoration via both FUT & FUE, SMP, scalp issues including scalp eczema & seborrheic dermatitis and many others

 

HSRP10's favorite FUT surgeons: *Dr. Konior, *Dr Hasson, Dr. Rahal

HSRP10's favorite FUE surgeons: *Dr. Konior, *Dr. Bisanga, Dr. Erdogan, Dr. Couto

(*indicates actual experience with doctor)

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