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Maternal and Paternal Hair Loss Inheritance


delancey
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Hey guys,

 

"The gene for baldness is on the X chromosome. As a guy, you inherited your Y from your dad and your X from your mom. But she inherited one X from her mom and one from her dad. If you got the X that she got from your maternal grandfather, then you will have his pattern of baldness."

 

I came across an interesting quote online, illustrating a strong link between your hair loss being connected with your maternal grandfather. In other words, if he was bald, there is a strong possibility that you may have inherited it from him.

 

My father is a Norwood 6, and became so at a relatively young age. I am 28, and am a Norwood 5 going on 6 (on Propecia right now). So it would seem likely that I inherited it from my father. However, here is where it gets interesting. My paternal grandfather was bald (minor crown loss) but not nearly as bald as my father is. My uncle inherited my paternal grandfather's baldness; it is identical. However, in my father's case, I feel confident that he got it from his maternal grandfather (who also was a Norwood 6).

 

In my case, I feel as if though I lost the genetic lottery since both my father and maternal grandfather are bald. I believe, but don't quote me on this, that your likelihood of losing hair increases significantly if this is the case.

 

This concerns me, for my dad's baldness at the age of 50 is acceptable, yes, he is a Norwood 6, however, a lot can be done for a Norwood 6 today, assuming favorable characteristics. However, my maternal grandfather lost a lot of hair, especially later on in life. I would say he was a Norwood 6/7 hybrid. His sides were high, however the sides had receded back to his ears. He still had some hair growing on top (connected to the sides), but not a lot at the age of 70. Also his hair thinned out a lot later on in life. What is even more interesting is that my mother's two brothers both have full heads of hair. And guess what? My mother's maternal grandfather had a full head of hair until the day he passed away.

 

Is this just a mere coincidence, or is the link between our maternal grandfather and hair loss just this significant?

 

I would really appreciate some insight into this topic, as hair loss is hereditary, and it is something that really affects so many men. It would be interesting to see if you got it from your mother's side of the family or your father's side.

I am not a medical professional and my words should not be taken as medical advice. All opinions and views shared are my own.

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The saying that mpb is inherited from your mother is an old wives tale. Androgenetic alopecia is an autosomal dominant disorder with variable penetrance. This means that its inheritance is not sex related, it is a dominant disorder so if it runs in your family you are more than likely going to inherit it, and to what extent a person will be effected is variable and cannot be fully determined by looking at family history.

 

Short story is you can inherit mpb from either parent.

 

Also anyone who tells you where the gene for mpb is located is full of shit, because there is no single one gene involved and all of the genes involved have not been identified. There are numerous genes and pathways involved in mpb which is why it is proving so hard to identify and treat.

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Genes. I have seen like sometimes two, sometimes three and even four brothers.

Two look same , three look same, four bros look pretty much similar.

I mean to say brothers have similar facial characteristics, body and height too.

Trust me among three two were class 7 by age of 30 and age difference was just 2 years.

Among four bros, two of them I mean eldest and youngest were class5 and class7. The rest of them have head full of hair like really shaggy scalp. Their is no concrete and canonical rigid theory to blame genes.

Its my opinion I think baldness is the worst curse and most traumatic and most depressive thing to happen to men. I have seen lot , lot of people when they are suffering from progressive baldness their confidence drip and they lack their self esteem and lose all the confidence. Many people they just can't even look into the eyes and talk. I have notice one thing oily scalp is the culprit and more oily the scalp more is the hairloss. Its my opinion.

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Their is no concrete and canonical rigid theory to blame genes.

 

That's because you have no understanding of genetics. One thing you said is true however, there is no rigid theory to blame genes, there is just mountains of scientific evidence.

 

P.s.- Not sure how the word "canonical" applies here. Are you implying that cannon law somehow relates to hair loss?

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Thanks for the replies, guys. I think this is a very important topic to discuss, not just necessarily who your hair loss comes from, but also looking at pictures of your maternal grandfather to give you an idea of what your hair situation may look like in 40 years from now. MPB is progressive, unfortunately and unpredictable, and while we can't say with certainty that "this is what your hair will look like in 10 years", it does give us a good idea of what you may expect in the future.

 

 

I think where we are today certainly illustrates that the hair transplant industry is moving in the right direction, although I would like to see more regulation and oversight. It is shocking to see some of these doctors who are still performing plug transplants. In the right hands, however, with average or above average donor characteristics, there is certainly hope for even Norwood 6 candidates, and I think even very reputable Drs on this site feel more comfortable restoring Norwood 6 patients today than say just 10 years ago. So skill and technology is progressing, which is an important factor, for better technology and skill today leads to improved technology and skill tomorrow, at a faster rate. So that is a positive.

 

Sorry to digress, I would like to learn more about what we know about MBP and genetics. It would also be interesting to see who you inherited your hair loss from? Your father or your maternal grandfather? Not to say that it cannot be inherited from other relatives, however, studies today are pointing towards MPB coming from both sides of the family, and appear to narrow it down specifically towards your maternal grandfather or your father. And as I mentioned above, my maternal grandfather was bald, however his two sons (my uncles) have full heads of hair, similar to my uncles' maternal grandfather. I think this shows that while it can be inherited from both sides of the family, the "X" chromosome from your paternal grandfather, should you get it, plays a strong role in determining your pattern of hair loss. Fortunately for me, I think I got it from my father.

 

Who did you inherit your pattern from?

 

Where do you feel the industry is heading, in say 10 years from now?

I am not a medical professional and my words should not be taken as medical advice. All opinions and views shared are my own.

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Thanks for the replies, guys. I think this is a very important topic to discuss, not just necessarily who your hair loss comes from, but also looking at pictures of your maternal grandfather to give you an idea of what your hair situation may look like in 40 years from now. MPB is progressive, unfortunately and unpredictable, and while we can't say with certainty that "this is what your hair will look like in 10 years", it does give us a good idea of what you may expect in the future.

 

 

I think where we are today certainly illustrates that the hair transplant industry is moving in the right direction, although I would like to see more regulation and oversight. It is shocking to see some of these doctors who are still performing plug transplants. In the right hands, however, with average or above average donor characteristics, there is certainly hope for even Norwood 6 candidates, and I think even very reputable Drs on this site feel more comfortable restoring Norwood 6 patients today than say just 10 years ago. So skill and technology is progressing, which is an important factor, for better technology and skill today leads to improved technology and skill tomorrow, at a faster rate. So that is a positive.

 

Sorry to digress, I would like to learn more about what we know about MBP and genetics. It would also be interesting to see who you inherited your hair loss from? Your father or your maternal grandfather? Not to say that it cannot be inherited from other relatives, however, studies today are pointing towards MPB coming from both sides of the family, and appear to narrow it down specifically towards your maternal grandfather or your father. And as I mentioned above, my maternal grandfather was bald, however his two sons (my uncles) have full heads of hair, similar to my uncles' maternal grandfather. I think this shows that while it can be inherited from both sides of the family, the "X" chromosome from your paternal grandfather, should you get it, plays a strong role in determining your pattern of hair loss. Fortunately for me, I think I got it from my father.

 

Who did you inherit your pattern from?

 

Where do you feel the industry is heading, in say 10 years from now?

I am not a medical professional and my words should not be taken as medical advice. All opinions and views shared are my own.

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ABC, thanks for sharing.

 

My dad is 50 and is a Norwood 6, and he started losing his hair at the same time as me (20s, with a clear Norwood 6 pattern in his late 20s).

 

However, my maternal grandfather kept his hair until his 40s, and then lost a significant amount of hair (I would say he was a hybrid between Norwood 6 and 7 with significant donor thinning).

 

Since I am 28 and lost a lot of hair similar to my dad in my younger days, does this mean that most likely I will end up like him when I turn 50? Or is it possible that I got very unlucky and will end up like my dad when I am young and my maternal grandfather when I am old?

I am not a medical professional and my words should not be taken as medical advice. All opinions and views shared are my own.

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My Dad is a NW5, paternal Grandfather is a NW6, his father had hair when he died, but it was thin.

 

Some of my cousins are bald and some have hair.

 

My mom doesn't have the thickest hair but I would not describe it as FPB either, her brother has full head, and their father is probably a NW3, but I haven't seen him in years. Her grandfather on her mom's side was a NW7 and I am not sure about the other one.

 

I think my genes are a crap shoot and I could fall anywhere on the spectrum from my uncle who still has a full head of hair to my cousin that was a NW6 at 22. I will probably fall somewhere in between , so I really don't pay much attention to it. I am about to turn 35 so early and aggressive MPB is about past me. I am guessing that I will be the guy who slowly looses a little year by year. That said, things could still get aggressive so I am keeping an eye on things and taking meds.

I am an online representative for Dr. Raymond Konior who is an elite member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

View Dr. Konior's Website

View Spanker's Website

I am not a medical professional and my opinions should not be taken as medical advice.

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I agree with Greatjob: the "genetic" aspect of androgenic (or androgenetic) alopecia is polygenetic with variable penetrance. Meaning there are multiple genes involved and expression of the genes can differ as well. This is why trying to establish familial patterns and estimate one's own NW pattern based upon a father, brother, grandfather (etc), is a bit of a futile exercise. If you have a family member with androgenic alopecia, you may possess the same genetic potential and could end up with some level of hair loss.

"Doc" Blake Bloxham - formerly "Future_HT_Doc"

 

Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

 

All opinions are my own and my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

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