Jump to content

The new "iGrow" solution to baldness from Apple


bunnyman
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

Ok, this is not really an iSolution from Apple Inc, but there is a new baldness cure according to the British "Sunday Telegraph" newspaper today (24 Nov 2013) that is called the iGrow helmet.

 

As we are not allowed to post external links, I am including the article text below for your information:

 

iGrow: a helmet that cures baldness (and plays music)

 

"Sometimes a gadget comes along that leaves you baffled at how such a thing can actually exist. They are either incredibly good, or shockingly bad.

It’s hard to know which category iGrow fits into, since it looks like something that would be laughed out of the Dragon’s Den studio, yet promises boldly to solve a problem that blights the lives of millions of men.

iGrow is pitched as a long term solution to male pattern baldness, and is “an FDA-approved device that uses low level laser therapy (LLLT) to stimulate hair follicles”.

Simply place it your head, switch it on via the attached (ultra low-tech) remote, let the little red lights (a combination of red laser and LED light diodes) inside the helmet painlessly do their thing, and after 20 minutes’ use every other day for about four months, you can expect to see an increase in hair growth of up to 40 per cent, according to a study published by the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery.

What’s troubling is that iGrow looks like it was put together in the Doctor Who props department in the late ‘80s using an old bike helmet, some Christmas tree lights, a can of silver paint and some cheap on-ear headphones (which are presumably to drown out the sound of other people’s laughter when they clock what you’re wearing).

 

But we shouldn't just a product like this on appearances alone. If iGrow really does “energise cell activity in the follicle tube” and encourage stronger, thicker hair growth, many men will consider it ?665 well spent - no matter how ridiculous it looks. At that price, a fraction of the cost of a Harley Street hair transplant, it's a steal. And with eight million men in Britain suffering from hair loss (and 40 per cent of under-35s going thin on top) there's clearly a market for hair restoration products.

 

Although if it doesn't work, you've just bought yourself an extremely expensive pair of headphones."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Senior Member

so will all of us soon look like this guy as we type away on this message board?

 

I am skeptical too!

 

 

igrow_helmet_01.jpg

 

igrow-banner.jpg

Dr. Dow Stough - 1000 Grafts - 1996

Dr. Jerry Wong - 4352 Grafts - August 2012

Dr. Jerry Wong - 2708 Grafts - May 2016

 

Remember a hair transplant turns back the clock,

but it doesn't stop the clock.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member
so will all of us soon look like this guy as we type away on this message board?

 

I am skeptical too!

 

 

igrow_helmet_01.jpg

 

igrow-banner.jpg

 

hes obviously on a dating site but bet he didnt use a photo of him wearing that for his profile pic

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Senior Member

This crap angers me. There is always going to be someone (until a cure comes along) that is waiting in the wings to suck a desperate person out of money.

I am an online representative for Dr. Raymond Konior who is an elite member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

View Dr. Konior's Website

View Spanker's Website

I am not a medical professional and my opinions should not be taken as medical advice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Saying they received FDA approval is actually a con-job.

 

The FDA approved that this product (and the laser comb) would NOT cause damage/injury, not that it actually grows hair (look it up). As I mentioned in a recent post, I was pissed off enough that I researched all these silly LLLT helmets and figured out that a person can buy 250 LLLP lasers with a power pack and make the exact same thing as the lasercap for less than $100.

 

This stupid iGrow helmet is adding insult to injury in that they're not even using 100% true laser diodes. They're using a mix of LLLT laser diodes and super cheap LED light. LEDs like you see on consumer electronics. These things cost pennies! Total scam. It's all a scam but iGrow is probably the worst offender. By the way...the laser intensity of the true lasers is exactly the same as those red boardroom laser pointers. This is not rocket science folks. Invest 25-$100 and make your own. You'll have more fun and something funny to show at parties. You want music? Listen to your ipod.\

 

That said, I recently bought a 1mm dermaroller and have been rolling almost everyday for a month. I don't know if it simply assisting a more rapid absorption of rogaine but it works!!! I see growth and my scalp feels great. Total invested? About $15 on Amazon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member
Saying they received FDA approval is actually a con-job.

 

The FDA approved that this product (and the laser comb) would NOT cause damage/injury, not that it actually grows hair (look it up). As I mentioned in a recent post, I was pissed off enough that I researched all these silly LLLT helmets and figured out that a person can buy 250 LLLP lasers with a power pack and make the exact same thing as the lasercap for less than $100.

 

This stupid iGrow helmet is adding insult to injury in that they're not even using 100% true laser diodes. They're using a mix of LLLT laser diodes and super cheap LED light. LEDs like you see on consumer electronics. These things cost pennies! Total scam. It's all a scam but iGrow is probably the worst offender. By the way...the laser intensity of the true lasers is exactly the same as those red boardroom laser pointers. This is not rocket science folks. Invest 25-$100 and make your own. You'll have more fun and something funny to show at parties. You want music? Listen to your ipod.\

 

That said, I recently bought a 1mm dermaroller and have been rolling almost everyday for a month. I don't know if it simply assisting a more rapid absorption of rogaine but it works!!! I see growth and my scalp feels great. Total invested? About $15 on Amazon.

 

 

An excellent and informative post. Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Senior Member

That said, I recently bought a 1mm dermaroller and have been rolling almost everyday for a month. I don't know if it simply assisting a more rapid absorption of rogaine but it works!!! I see growth and my scalp feels great. Total invested? About $15 on Amazon.

 

Worked means what? Any noticeable hair growth?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Am I over-reacting here for finding this product, the name in particular to be patronising toward hair loss sufferers? Also, do they have a "genius" team to assist with any problems for this product? :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • Regular Member
Worked means what? Any noticeable hair growth?

 

Hey I'm sorry for the late reply. Actually, yes, it seems to have had a positive effect on haircount/thickness. I stopped using rogaine foam shortly after my last post and I haven't used finasteride for years so I guess I can attribute any improvement to vitamins and the dermaroller. My scalp feels much better and as weird as it may seem, scalp laxity has seemingly improved with the roller and occasional laxity exercises. I'm impressed.

 

As for the iGrow...During my research I remember seeing an FDA warning letter that was sent to the makers of the iGrow. If I remember correctly, their product no longer matches the application submitted to get FDA approval because they removed and replaced more than half of the lasers with cheap LED lights (probably to increase their already stratospheric profit margin. Disclaimer...I think all these laser cap makers are scamartists and for me, the makers of the iGrow are the worst offenders.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I got one and have just started using it. I tried Rogaine. It worked after four months but was messy, tedious and a major hassle. This iGrow helmet is easy to use and there are no chemicals. No matter what anyone says, the Question is does it actually work? Is there any noticeable hair growth? I am not recommending it because it is too early to tell. I will not know if it works until three to six months. If it does, it is worth the money to me. Also, different treatments do not work for everyone either. This iGrow Helmet may be a big scam or something that can help with hair loss and hair growth. For me, it is worth a gamble. It is for you to decide. I will let you know after six months!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...
  • 3 months later...
  • Senior Member
This crap angers me. There is always going to be someone (until a cure comes along) that is waiting in the wings to suck a desperate person out of money.

 

Exactly. This is absolute crap. Genetics are pretty tough to beat. Even FDA approved medication and cosmetic surgery will only buy you time of having a desired look. In the end, you are a fool if you think your genetics will not win the war.

 

This laser treatment is more likely to lead to cancer than regrow a single hair or help keep a hair from falling out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Senior Member

IMHO

The only positive thing you will see is that your bank account will be 3k less & a loss of more hair cas your wife is on your back cas you spent $$$ on such a BS thing when she's been asking for a new kitchen for yrs...LOL

 

I can make one of these BS things for less than $100.00

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
  • Senior Member

this crap does not work. FDA just approves for saftey, not efficiency. A lot of folks are suckered into this scam aka deception. I have not seen any noticeable or substantial changes from any damn laser comb or laser cap use. A waste of money without any substantial evidence or claims to back it up. Deception at its finest. if anything, it probably may induce a placebo effect in sōme folks but this is something that just isnt scientifically nor adequately proven. ridiculous

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...