Jump to content

So, just how dense is the average '45grafts sq/cm" anyway?


Recommended Posts

  • Senior Member

It really depends where the hair is being placed, how much native hair you already have, thickness of your hair, colour of yr hair.

It might be best to post some picks and see what responses you get then. But 45 grafts per cm2, can give a good outcome, may want a little more dense if it's hairline but then it depends how much area to cover and future loss.

Hair Transplant Dr Feller Oct 2011

 

Hair Transplant Dr Lorenzo June 2014

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Senior Member

I'm 9 months post-op with 45/cm2 transplanted to the forehead (so no pre-existing hair). At this point the scalp is still visible in dim lighting. I'm hoping for more thickening in the coming months but I'm starting to think I'll need a 2nd small procedure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Senior Member

Luck,

 

There is no formal definition or quantification for the term "dense packing." It will vary between physicians and depend on the patient's balding pattern and hair characteristics as well.

 

Just for reference:

 

Normal density (in non-androgenic alopecia/female pattern hair loss scalp) is 80-100 follicular units/sq cm.

 

Hair loss/thinning is visible when approximately 50% of the native hair sheds; this means it is visible at roughly 40-45 FU/cm^2.

 

Most physicians implant anywhere between 45 (some use 50 as a minimum) - 70 (some as high as 80-90 when indicated) FU/cm^2.

 

Hope this helps!

"Doc" Blake Bloxham - formerly "Future_HT_Doc"

 

Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

 

All opinions are my own and my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Senior Member

Hi Luck,

 

Again, I think it's a subjective term. On some patients, 45 grafts/sq cm may be a "dense pack," while others may require 60 (etc) to meet the same level of thick, natural coverage.

"Doc" Blake Bloxham - formerly "Future_HT_Doc"

 

Forum Co-Moderator and Editorial Assistant for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

 

All opinions are my own and my advice does not constitute as medical advice. All medical questions and concerns should be addressed by a personal physician.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

The more grafts the more likely it is for them to not survive and grow I I'm not mistaken, so high numbers if grafts like 60-70 a probably done better over 2 procedures.

That may be why surgeons like bhatti treat 45 as the standard number to reduce the risk of this happening, but it s possible to get a large number of grafts and have them survive

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
  • Senior Member
The more grafts the more likely it is for them to not survive and grow I I'm not mistaken, so high numbers if grafts like 60-70 a probably done better over 2 procedures.

That may be why surgeons like bhatti treat 45 as the standard number to reduce the risk of this happening, but it s possible to get a large number of grafts and have them survive

 

Yep very correct, even I was gonna ask everyone here that how much sense does it make sense to do a dense packing and invite the possibility of a risk of some graft not surviving and hence what is the ideal dense packing but 45-55 Grafts per Sq.Cm looks a safer option.

 

But my question here is, if some one is just a Norwood 2 or maybe 3 and most likely he is not gonna repeat a HT ever in his life with a say 45 Grafts per sq.cm he may be left with a see through result so should one attempt a High density in the first attempt or even not willing still go for a second procedure to increase density is really a catch 22 situation !!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...