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KWC

Zeroing-In on Implantation Techniques and Tools

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Hi everyone. Great forums! However, there seems to be little discussion specifically about implantation techniques and tools. Assuming that a patient has done his due diligence, and decided what kind of extraction he prefers, it seems to me that some of the most critical aspects of a fairly std, first time, realistic-expectation HT surgery are still to be addressed. Of these, I'd like to discuss the method and tools of implantation step specifically.

 

Assuming for a moment that all other factors (e.g. extraction, FU treatment in between extraction and implantation, quality and artistry, doctors' skill levels, etc.) are equal, it seems to me that the process of making the recipient-incision and inserting the FU into it - the technique of actual insertion - is very important. In this thread, I'm hoping to discuss the actual implantation techniques / tools and skillsets used by physicians. It seems to me that this is a step which can 'make or break' a good HT surgery, yet it is NOT standard ‘across the board’ by any means, and I suspect this step can have a big effect on viability, and ultimately the overall result of the surgery. So I'd like to hear your thoughts, and experiences specifically about the pros and cons of different implantation techniques. As a premise, I'd like to offer the following:

 

 

 

  1. I know that some doctors use a flat-blade to make (straight) incisions, some use a hypodermic needle to make ('C'-shaped) incisions, and others use 'other tools'.
  2. I have begun to suspect that a technique that involves actually creating the incision and then ‘shoe-horning’-in the FU either as the incision is made or as the incision tool is pulled from the incision might hold inherent advantages over techniques which involve ‘stuffing’ the FU into a ‘slit’ incision with jeweler’s forceps. Especially since the FU cannot (should not) be handled by the bulb, meaning, if forceps are used to insert the FU, it must be 'grabbed' with the forceps ABOVE the bulb, making it more difficult to insert (for basic mechanical reasons, largely because the FU is flexible, the bulb is of larger diameter than the shaft, and that bulb must be inserted into an incision which is naturally 'closed' when the scalp skin is relaxed).
  3. There is a tool called the 'Choi' (SP?) tool into which the FU is evidently inserted just before it is used to (A) make the implant incision, inserting the FU as it does, and then (B) pulled from the scalp, leaving the FU implanted. Of course, doctors will have their preferences for tols, but these notwithstanding, it seems as if this 'Choi' tool may hold inherent advantages, should the tool actually work well.
  4. I have been told that improvements have been made on this tool over the last 15 years or so, and that the tool now comes in various 'sizes', e.g for different sizes of FU implantation, which would seem to be advantageous also.

 

Has anyone had any experience with these various implantation / insertion techniques / tools? Any insight will be greatly appreciated. :)

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Hi folks,

 

I posted this question weeks ago, see there are about 73 'views' but no replies ... am i doing something wrong? :( I am trying to get opinions on the techniques and tools for the actual implantation step of a HT surgery. Any thoughts welcome...:)

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I posted this question weeks ago, see there are about 73 'views' but no replies ... am i doing something wrong?

 

I would assume the problem might be that the vast majority of people

on this forum do not have the technical knowledge to comment about

such a specific aspect of the surgery you are asking about. And the

various doctors and reps probably are reluctant to comment because

it could lead to a "my way is better than your way" conversation that

might be more confusing to patients than it's worth.


Dr. Dow Stough - 1000 Grafts - 1996

Dr. Jerry Wong - 4352 Grafts - August 2012

Dr. Jerry Wong - 2708 Grafts - May 2016

 

Remember a hair transplant turns back the clock,

but it doesn't stop the clock.

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Thanks Shampoo, yeah i suspected that but thought I'd try anyway. I have learned that only a few doctors considered 'one of the best' seem to use the tool, and there are concerns about it damaging the FU's. But the fact remains that using jewelers forceps does by definition create the problem i describe in my post ... then there is the 'stick and plant' technique, which i have seen in a video...

 

Is there any info you have on FU insertion techniques at all? OR even a weblink or 3 that would help me learn of the actual pros and cons of the different methods? You can email me if you prefer. Thanks

 

Sincerely,

 

KWC

(love the B&B avatar ...)

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So how is the Choi implanter loaded? Wouldn't they have to pick up the grafts with something similar to the tools others use to insert the hair in the slot? It must be that doing the former, putting it in the choi cartridge or whatever it is, is easier on the graft, but I wonder how the tech controls the depth and orientation of the graft if the graft is hidden in that cartridge? There used to be many threads on the orientation of slits, but it seems that people aren't curious anymore, maybe there is nothing we can do, I mean, I've never heard if a doc asking a prospective patient if he wants lateral slits or whatever.

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