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Bill - Managing Publisher

PLEASE READ - How to Take and Present Compelling and Realistic Photos

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Dear Physician members of our commuity,

 

Thank you for your willingness to regularly present photos on our forum community for review. Unlike the past where patients considering you for surgery heard very little about you online, patients can now decide for themselves based on the regular results you present. In addition, these photo albums will be added to your doctor profiles on the Hair Transplant Network, and Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center (for Coalition members only).

 

However, it's extremely important that when creating photo albums that you provide enough pictures and information for patients to properly evaluate the result.

 

 

Ideal Photos to Present

 

The ideal photo album should include the following photos.

 

1. Hairline Before

2. Hairline Immediately Postop

3. Hairline After

4. 45 Degree Tilt Before

5. 45 Degree Tilt Immediately Postop

6. 45 Degree Tilt After

7. Top of the Head Before

8. Top of the Head Postop

9. Top of the Head After

10. Crown Before (if applicable)

11. Crown Immediately Postop (if applicable)

12. Crown After(if applicable)

13. Donor Scar Postop

14. Donor Scar After

 

Clear closeups of the hairline in particular is extremely important. You may also want to consider adding profile before, immediately postoperative, and after photos as well.

 

 

Consistency in Photos is Vital

 

Each photo cannot be larger than 500K however, photos should be crystal clear and large enough that the patient can see an accurate representation of the result.

 

Each before, immediately postoperative, and after photos should be taken at consistent angles, lighting, and background. It is preferred that you do not use flash for any of your photos. If you insist on using flash, be consistent in your before/after photos. Before and after pictures should show hair at the same consistency (both dry or both wet) and similar style. If you show a before photo parting the hair to show an obviouis bald spot, be sure to do the same in an after picture. Combing hair over the bald spot in the after picture is deceptive (even if unintentional). Ultimately, please be consistent in your photographs.

 

 

Providing Adequate Surgical Details

 

Album subjects at the very least should include the doctor's name and the number of grafts.

 

Surgical details are also extremely important and should be added into the album introduction. Without the number of grafts and strategic plan including patient goals at the very least, patients will be guessing why you've taken the approach you did.

 

 

Allowing Forum Members to Comment

 

By default, a checkbox is selected that allows forum members to comment. However, recently, a few physicians have deselected this box not allowing members to offer their genuine feedback. Please leave this option selected so members can offer their constructive feedback. Allowing members to comment and interacting with them is to your benefit and the benefit of this community.

 

 

Impressive Photo Album Example

 

For an example of a recent impressive patient photo album, see "Dense Packing FUT performed by Dr. Feriduni - NW Class V - 4010 FU Grafts".

 

Though you are not required to add this much detail, the more information and photos you add, the more prospective patients will understand the work that you do which will help them as they consider your clinic for surgery.

 

Kudos to all clinics who have risen to the challenge and presented their photos publicly.

 

Best wishes,

 

Bill


I am the managing publisher of the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog and this Hair Loss Forum. I am also a 4 time hair transplant patient. View my patient hair loss website to view my entire hair restoration journey with photos.

Remember, true beauty radiates from within, not from the skin.

I am not a medical professional and my words should not be taken as medical advice. All opinions and views shared are my own.

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Great topic, Thanks Bill,

It is extremely important to be consistent with the photo quality such as using flash and the angles. Also it is important to read the details of before and after pictures, such as the number of grafts, and surgeries and the time period after hair transplant.


Parsa Mohebi, M.D.

Medical Director of

Parsa Mohebi Hair Restoration

 

Dr. Parsa Mohebi is recommended on the Hair Transplant Network

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I think it is very important to present with high quality photos. I am not a professional photographer and I donot have a small studio set up for taking pictures like some clinics already have. But eversince I started to be more active on the forum with presentations a few months ago, I have tried hard to improve my pictures. I have already bought a better camera and follow the directions as far as lighting and the angles with the pictures. However I must say that the pictures donot tell the story and most of my patients actually look alot better in person then the pictures. Any how I hope with time it improves.


Dr. Meshkin is recommended on the Hair Transplant Network

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personally, I'd vote for all photos taken close up under an incandescent light bulb or direct sunlight. the flash bulbs and blue screens make the hair look thicker because it casts shadows where as the light bulb /sun pierce right through down to the scalp revealing the hair's true appearance.

 

and any clinic of patient that applies product should be banned. who cares what your hair looks like w/ product!? might as well just wear a wig. but, I digress....

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There are some points I agree with and some I disagree with. First, I'm glad there is a sticky to help guide physicians on the photos they are taking for presentation on this forum.

 

The listing of angles to make standard for photo shoots is good but the profiles should be mandatory too, as should be the parting and showing of the donor scar (where applicable)

Close ups of the hairline should of course be mandatory but also making sure the exit point of the grafts are visible as well. This is very important to represent the naturalness of a result and allowing the hair to fall forward covering the actual hairline in shadow does no one any good. If you can't see the actual hairline then hairline shots are useless.

 

 

What I disagree with are the examples provided for this thread. I feel the examples are not representative of the consistency we should all strive for and in fact show us what NOT to do. There are too many flash and non-flash photographs showing the results with all of the flash photos taken for the final result but not for any of the pre-op or progression photos. The flash images are making the hairline look twice as thick as what is most likely the case in reality. Do I know from seeing this patient in person? No, but I know from understanding the numbers used for his procedure(s) and I know from studying how flash affects hair for the past ten years.

 

NO FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY SHOULD EVER BE USED. EVER. THERE IS NO REASON FOR IT.

 

We stopped using flash ten years ago when I first started working for Hasson & Wong because I saw such a huge difference in results in photos vs. what I would see when I met the patient. There simply is no legitimate reason why flash should be used. Every digital camera on the market today has an "auto" feature that will disable flash if necessary so you can get all the auto settings you need if you don't know how to set them yourself and you don't have the flash that makes the image unnecessarily thick compared to the real result.

 

I understand and have always supported the need for consistency with angles but I think it is imperative to initiate a requirement for no flash as no other factor in photos influences the perceived result more. Eliminating the option to present photos with flash evens the playing field even more and more importantly allows the potential patient to make a more informed decision based on viewing results.


The Truth is in The Results

 

Dr. Victor Hasson and Dr. Jerry Wong are members of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians

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I agree with Joe here. Clinics that use flash are not portraying the accurate result.

 

Oddly enough, I may have to revise my statement regarding flash. There could be situations where a flash may be beneficial such as when a flash is bounced off the ceiling (via adjustable flash) to better illuminate the top of the scalp and the room in general. Straight on flash, on the same plane as the subject, is what makes for such dramatic differences. When I have time I'll put together some examples and demonstrations via video.


The Truth is in The Results

 

Dr. Victor Hasson and Dr. Jerry Wong are members of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians

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Oddly enough, I may have to revise my statement regarding flash. There could be situations where a flash may be beneficial such as when a flash is bounced off the ceiling (via adjustable flash) to better illuminate the top of the scalp and the room in general. Straight on flash, on the same plane as the subject, is what makes for such dramatic differences. When I have time I'll put together some examples and demonstrations via video.

 

I also question when certain clinics post blurry and/or dark shots that were taken by a patient. I know for a fact that my hairline looks much better when I'm standing in a darker room.

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Oddly enough, I may have to revise my statement regarding flash. There could be situations where a flash may be beneficial such as when a flash is bounced off the ceiling (via adjustable flash) to better illuminate the top of the scalp and the room in general. Straight on flash, on the same plane as the subject, is what makes for such dramatic differences. When I have time I'll put together some examples and demonstrations via video.

 

After more research in the Tillman photo studio I've concluded that no, there is no reason to use flash, ever. Period. At all. Never. Good lighting is key. One can use reflectors and lights as would be found in a proper studio but never flash. I was previously mentioning how a flash bounced off of a ceiling might be acceptable but it is not. I worked with this technique as a photographer would when shooting a model and in no way does flash allow a result to be represented as it would be in a normal room lighting scenario. Flash can even overcome outdoor lighting to skew a result. That is all.


Joe Tillman

aka "Jotronic"

 

Current Affiliations:

- Dr. Emre Karadeniz - Istanbul, Turkey

- Dr. Michael Vories - South Carolina, USA

- Beauty Medical/ TriAC™- Milan, Italy

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-

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I agree with Joe here. Clinics that use flash are not portraying the accurate result.

 

Mickey, you do realize that the majority of the clinics you advocate in your signature use harsh flash for most of their photos, right?


Joe Tillman

aka "Jotronic"

 

Current Affiliations:

- Dr. Emre Karadeniz - Istanbul, Turkey

- Dr. Michael Vories - South Carolina, USA

- Beauty Medical/ TriAC™- Milan, Italy

-

-

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I think that videos should be mandatory. Unfortunately some doctors cannot be trusted with their misleading pictures. I am talking from my own experience.

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