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Quality Control


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Yesterday I had the pleasure of performing surgery on a regular viewer of this site. He may be a poster, but I didn't ask. He certainly seems very knowledgeable so I wouldn't be surprised. During our surgery we were discussing how to ensure quality in a hair transplant. It occurred to me that one simple way would be to take photos of the surgery while it was being done and then posting it immediately for the world to see BEFORE the final results. Perhaps if everyone did this, the quality of the work would increase across the board.

This patient had 1500 grafts packed into the front third of the scalp.

sideclose.jpgnullside.jpgfront.jpgfrontback.jpgfrontclose.jpg

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Yesterday I had the pleasure of performing surgery on a regular viewer of this site. He may be a poster, but I didn't ask. He certainly seems very knowledgeable so I wouldn't be surprised. During our surgery we were discussing how to ensure quality in a hair transplant. It occurred to me that one simple way would be to take photos of the surgery while it was being done and then posting it immediately for the world to see BEFORE the final results. Perhaps if everyone did this, the quality of the work would increase across the board.

This patient had 1500 grafts packed into the front third of the scalp.

sideclose.jpgnullside.jpgfront.jpgfrontback.jpgfrontclose.jpg

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Hi Doc,

 

Thanks for keeping us informed. Can you explain the white protrusions on some of the graphs? I think I know what they are but I would appreciate it if you clarify what they are once again.

 

Thanks,

 

Jrp65

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  • Senior Member

Dr. Feller,

I agree and that is why I took the photos on this page... http://www.jotowen.com/Page2a.html . Granted, they are not as good as the ones you took simply because I was new at this documentation thing but you can rest assured come January 30th of next year I will have LOADS of pics during my procedure.

 

Great pics by the way.

 

Peace,

Jotronic

The Truth is in The Results

 

Dr. Victor Hasson and Dr. Jerry Wong are members of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians

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I will wait to hear Dr. Feller's response to your question. But it is my understanding that it is always best to leave the grafts a bit raised above the surface of the skin to avoid pitting.

 

The graft tissue above the surface of the scalp eventually sheds and the grafts become flush and smooth with the surface of the surrounding scalp.

 

The end result is that the scalp will have a smooth none pitted appearance in time.

 

Pat

Never Forget - It's what radiates from within, not from your skin, that really matters!

My Hair Loss Blog

Sharing is what keeps this community vital. Please join in. To learn how I restored my hair and started this community, click here.

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Thanks to both Jotronic and Dr. Feller for keeping it real by posting their photos in their raw and honest form, bumps, lumps, and all.

 

Pat

Never Forget - It's what radiates from within, not from your skin, that really matters!

My Hair Loss Blog

Sharing is what keeps this community vital. Please join in. To learn how I restored my hair and started this community, click here.

Follow our Community on Twitter.

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Thanks for your post and pictures. What are the white nodules above the incision lines? Is this characteristic of the lateral slit or are you planting the follicles higher out of the holes so they are more exposed? What is the reason for this. It is a different technique than I have seen from some other doctors. Thanks, best, WWH

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Jrp65 and WWH

The white protrusions are the tops of the grafts. Some epidermis and some dermis are visible. As Pat correctly pointed out, the raised parts will fall off in about a week and leave a properly placed graft flush within the skin. This is characteristic of either vertical or lateral slits. You may be more used to seeing dark crusting up there, this will happen over the next hour or so after surgery.

 

Noreaster

Surgery is not for the weak of stomach, that's for sure. I think it is amazing that the scalp can bounce back from such trauma... but thankfully it always does. As for side blending, I don't think it is necessary. The pictures don't really do the temple hair justice, but his sides are nice, thick, and far enough forward not to worry about. If he does lose some side hair in the future, the edges of the transplanted section are high enough to still look normal and unobvious.

 

I will post as many post op pics as this patient will allow. If he visits once per month, then I will be happy to post every month.

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It doesn't matter if it is a blade or a needle, as I've mentioned in other threads a needle produces a slit at this level anyway. It really comes down to the length of the follicle itself. This patient had a longer than average follicle so he has a bit more protruding, that's all. Don't worry if you didn't see this after your surgery, not everybody looks the same.

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