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bsmit

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  1. is this statement still true if all the grafts have anchored and the hair follicles have survived? if smoking can inhibit the grafts from reaching optimal growth, will the grafts reach optimal growth once you quit smoking? or will the grafts be permanently stunted. thanks for the input!
  2. I think this answers my question. Thanks again, Melvin. if I could ask a follow-up question: since the surviving grafts, in theory, will grow just as your native hair grows, then why do hair transplant surgeons recommend that patients quit smoking indefinitely? will smoking adversely impact the hair grafts, even after the grafts survive? in other words, why can’t a hair transplant patient resume smoking, at about one-month post-op, once the grafts have survived?
  3. yeah, that makes sense. so, in other words, the transplanted hairs will only be adversely impacted if the condition is severe enough to adversely impacted my native hair, correct? so, in theory, inadequate blood flow should only inhibit the growth of my transplanted hair if it would similarly inhibit the growth my native hair. is that essentially what you’re saying?
  4. I apologize if I’m not being clear. I’m asking you to assume that all of the grafts have survived. please assume that the grafts have survived and are fully capable of growing. please further assume that all of the grafts have shed. are there factors, such as an unhealthy scalp, that can cause the grafts to grow back at a slower rate? if so, once you remedy the underlying condition, will the grafts begin to grow? or can they be permanently stunted? thanks again. edit: my use of the word “unhealthy scalp” could simply mean dandruff or an inflamed scalp, not necessarily a medical condition.
  5. yes, this is exactly what I’m asking. thank you for clarifying. assuming someone is a smoker, will that prevent the newly grafted hair follicles from growing? if so, will the hair begin to grow if the person quits smoking? or, alternatively, will the smoking permanently stunt the newly grafted hair follicle? edit: this assumes that the hair follicles have successfully anchored to the scalp, survived, and are capable of receiving blood flow
  6. thanks for weighing in, Melvin. I’m asking to assume that the graft was not harmed or damaged. In other words, assume that the hair follicle has survived and is capable of growth. are there factors, such as an unhealthy scalp, that can delay growth? if so, once you remedy the underlying condition, will the hair begin to grow?
  7. good question. healthy skin definitely helps promote hair growth; thus, unhealthy skin probably inhibits hair growth. my question would be, assuming the grafts have anchored to the scalp, and assuming their growth has been inhibited by a skin condition, if you treat the skin condition, will the grafts begin to grow? or, alternatively, will they be permanently stunted? hopefully someone can shed some light on this.
  8. thanks for the reply! yeah, I think that’s right. however, in that case, the graft never would have anchored to the scalp. I’m wondering if there are any instances where a graft can fail to grow AFTER it has successfully anchored. any ideas? thanks again.
  9. thanks for the co-sign, HT! hopefully we’ll gain some insight into this matter
  10. Or are there factors that could prevent it from growing? For example, assuming the hair grafts anchor to the scalp, could a lack of bloodflow permanently prevent the hair from growing? Or will the hair begin to grow once the proper bloodflow is restored? Thanks for your help.
  11. I had a hair transplant 4 months ago. 2600 grafts were used to cover a 64cm area (hairline and temples). It wasn’t until after surgery that I noticed the density was only 41cm2 overall (50cm2 in the hairline and 30-35cm2 behind the hairline). Based on my research, this seems like the bare minimum in terms of density. Not to mention, my hair caliber is only 51 microns. should I be considered about the density? do you think I will require a second procedure? thanks in advance.
  12. Can a single pimple (not folliculitis) on the recipient area adversely impact the grafts at 4 weeks post-op? Thanks in advance!
  13. apparently it’s a “vegan” product, but i’m not sure if that makes it safe for use. the ingredients are listed on the website
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